FAQs

Below you can find answers to commonly asked capitalization questions. If you want a question featured here, feel free to contact us and we may include it!

Blogging

Bluehost is one of the most affordable hosting platforms out there and is a great option for people starting out with their first website or starting a blog. There are several different Bluehost pricing plans so we wanted to share with you today the benefits and prices of each hosting plan.

Bluehost WordPress Hosting Pricing Plans

The cheapest plan you can get from Bluehost is $2.95/mo (for a 3-year contract) for one site. You also get a free domain name. This is a shared hosting plan so you won’t be able to make custom configurations to the underlying server, but it is a great plan to host your first blog or website on. We actually hosted Capitalize My Title on this plan when we first started.

You can spend a little more per month and get hosting for unlimited sites with unlimited storage. Another great option if you want to begin expanding. Make sure that you understand what contract duration you need to commit to in order to receive this discount.

Bluehost WordPress Hosting Plans

Shared Website Hosting Pricing Plans

Similar to the shared WordPress hosting above, Bluehost also offers website hosting with an additional monthly hosting option that offers extra speed and a dedicated IP address.

Bluehost Shared Hosting Plans

VPS Hosting Plans

If you’re looking for more speed and control for your site, you should try a VPS (Virtual Private Server). This gives your site dedicated computing resources including processing cores, storage, and memory (RAM) so that your site can run unimpeded by other sites. These are obviously a bit more expensive than the shared hosting plans above since you are using dedicated resources from Bluehost, but the price is definitely worth it once your site has grown significantly. If you are getting hundreds or thousands of page views a day, it is time to upgrade to a VPS.

These VPS pricing plans range from $18.99/mo-$59.99/mo depending on how much storage, processing cores, and memory you need. If you only have one site, we recommend the Standard plan at $18.99/mo.

Bluehost Vps Hosting Plans

Dedicated Hosting Plans

Once your site has grown to tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of page views per day, it is time to get a dedicated hosting plan. These plans give you your own server with their own dedicated resources. You also get premium backups services like hard drive redundancy so you can be sure your websites are always live.

Bluehost Dedicated Hosting Plans

Other Recommended Resources:

Career

Jobscan is free for up to 5 scans and rescans per month. If you need more scan than that, it will cost you $49.95 per month or $89.95 for every 3 months which works out to $359.80 per year. See the plan details here.

The free plan includes 5 Match Rate Calculations/month, 5 Keyword Comparisons/month, and a scan history limit of 20. The paid plans include unlimited scans plus a ton more. See the full feature list below.

jobscan plans

Recommended Reading:

Code

The written word is built not only on proper spelling, but on proper punctuation too. It is no surprise, then, that when the world’s languages are expressed in written form, they feature letters (or characters), punctuation marks and special diacritics. We use these every day when we write physically. What you interpret as symbols, though, your computer interprets as binary code, systems of numbers, or encodings. Although these are mostly 1’s and 0’s, they form an intricate interface between our language and that of the machine. In the past, these encodings that helped computers to process symbols and characters were rather compact, making it difficult to represent all the world’s languages and their constituent symbols in text files. At some point, it was difficult to represent even English in a single encoding! Then came Unicode. But…

What is Unicode text?

Unicode is a Universal Character Encoding Standard. It specifies how characters are represented in text files, online webpages and many other types of documents. Above, we highlighted the more compact encoding standards of the past, a popular one being ASCII. Unlike ASCII, which was built around the English Language alone, Unicode was designed with the intent of representing symbols and characters from languages from all around the globe, with a support of about 1,000,000,000 different characters. True to Unicode’s advantage, ASCII supports only 128 characters. Essentially, Unicode text is capable of unambiguously representing any character, punctuation mark, diacritic from any of the world’s known and written languages.

encodingTo toy around with the idea, imagine what really happens when you change the font in a document. Those fancy, artsy looking characters that replace the bland, boring-looking default text are also a part of the specifications of your unicode text. Actually, among the hundreds of characters that constitute your Unicode text specifications exist variants of your current alphabet. These variants are linked to their equivalent normal alphabet so your computer knows exactly what to replace (and with what characters) when you select “Times New Roman” for example.

How it Works

As we mentioned earlier, your computer speaks the language of numbers, specifically binary code. In the case of character encodings, your computer assigns a number to each of the characters included in the Character Encoding Standard. Unicode provides each character with a unique number (think of it as the character’s ID) such that regardless of the platform or device on which the language is used, the character remains readily defined. Each character can be up to 4 bytes in size. To understand the implications of this size allowance, think back to how ASCII only supports 128 characters. It comes as no surprise given that ASCII uses only one byte per character. In essence, it has less “ID’s” to dedicate to individual characters than Unicode.

Popular Unicode Encodings

The most popular kinds of Unicode encodings are the UTF-8 and UTF-16 standards (although there are many other types of encodings). Many software programs and web pages now resort to the UTF-8 Standard as their standard encoding. You will find that although it supports up to 4 bytes per character, UTF-8 gives a lower memory allowance to the more commonly used characters. This is in the name of increasing efficiency. Therefore, characters of the English language are represented in one byte. Arabic, Latin and Hebrew characters are represented in 2 bytes and Asian characters are represented in three bytes. The full allowance of four bytes is usually reserved for any additional characters outside this scope.

Uniformity

The main advantage of Unicode is the uniformity it has brought to data interpretation the world over. Previously, text files and web pages were vulnerable to conflicting encodings that assigned the same number to different characters or different numbers to the same one! Computers were burdened with having to support multiple encodings to understand documents and web pages all while running the fervent risk of data corruption during transfers. With Unicode, the computing world has gained a sense of versatility in the cross platform compatibility of this Universal Character Encoding Standard. It facilitates an important part of the world’s main operating systems, browsers and search engines. In fact, the Internet and World-Wide Web owes the universality of character definition to Unicode.

To uppercase only the first letter in a cell in Excel, you can use the following formula:

=UPPER(LEFT(text_cell,1))&LOWER(RIGHT(text_cell,LEN(text_cell)-1))

For a sample string: “THIS is A SaMPLE StRIng.”

The result will be:

"This is a sample string."

A visual is below for your reference:

excel capitalize first letter

If you want to instead capitalize the first letter of each word in a cell, or uppercase/lowercase all characters in a cell, Excel already has some prebuilt formulas to do so.

For more questions about capitalization, use our free title capitalization tool.

JavaScript has different functions for different capitalization needs. You can use the following formulas for uppercasing and lowercasing a string as well as capitalizing only the first letter of a string.

var str = ‘This sentence needs SOME capitalization help.’;

// returns ‘this sentence needs some capitalization help.’
var lower = str.toLowerCase();

// returns ‘THIS SENTENCE NEEDS SOME CAPITALIZATION HELP.’
var upper = str.toUpperCase();

// returns ‘This sentence needs some capitalization help.’
var firstLetter = str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1);

For capitalizing only the first letter of a string, you can also use the following function:

function uppercaseFirstLetter(str) {
return str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1);
}

If you want to capitalize more than just strings in JavaScript, you can try our free title capitalization tool.

If you want to easily capitalize a string in JavaScript to uppercase, you can use this simple snippet of code:

var str = "Hello World!";
var newStr = str.toLowerCase();

The result will be:

"hello world!"

You can also capitalize only the first letter of a string or uppercase the whole string.

If you want to easily capitalize a string in JavaScript to uppercase, you can use this simple snippet of code:

var str = "Hello World!";
var newStr = str.toUpperCase();

The result will be:

"HELLO WORLD!"

You can also capitalize only the first letter of a string or lowercase the whole string.

To uppercase only the first letter in a string in JavaScript, you can use the following code:

var str = "Hello World!";
var newStr = str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1);

The result will be:

"Hello world!"

To reuse this code multiple times, you can use the following function:
function uppercaseFirstLetter(str) {
return str.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + str.slice(1);
}

You can also capitalize the entire string or lowercase the whole string.

Grammar

In the English language, there are many words that sound the same as other words. These words may sound the same, but they are spelled differently and have different meanings. These similar sounding words are called homophones. Some examples include: wear and where, chord and cord, or knew and new. The term homophone can also include the terms homographs and homonyms.

Homophone vs Homonym vs Homograph

Words that are spelled the same but have different meanings or pronunciations are called homographs. For example, the words tie and tie. One refers to the accessory that men may wear around their necks, while the other is the verb or action we take when we knot our shoelaces. An example of a homograph that is spelled the same but pronounced differently is lead. In the sentence “Lead paint is poisonous”, the word lead is pronounced differently than it is in this sentence: “The mother duck lead her babies away from the pond.” These words also have different meanings because of the context they are written in.

The term homonym is a larger umbrella term that refers to both homophones and homographs. The word homonym means common name, which refers to the fact that it is shared by both homophones and homographs. Essentially, homophones are homonyms and homographs are homonyms, but homophones are not homographs.

Homographs In Language

Homographs may also vary by region. For example, in the United States (as in many other countries), dialects vary by geographic region. In the southern United States, the word pen may be pronounced the same as the word pin. However, this would not be the case in other regions of the United States based on their regional dialects.

The word homophone’s first recorded use was in the 1600s. It comes from the Greek word homophonos. The Greek root homo- means same. The second half of the word, phono- means either sound, utterance or voice (depending on the translation or context). So, literally, the word homophone means same sound.

Homophones are often used in wordplay and puns. Here’s an example from a children’s joke: Where do polar bears vote? The North Poll. In this pun, the homophone poll replaces the correct word pole.

While it may be a bit confusing when you get into the technical terms associated with homophones, the most commonly used definition of this grammar term is its simplest: a homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but it is spelled differently and has a different meaning.

No, but you can still get a Grammarly discount on us. There is no Grammarly student discount through Grammarly’s website, but by clicking our banner below, you can get a Grammarly discount all the same. It’s like having a Grammarly student discount after all!

grammarly discount banner - grammarly review

 

Grammarly does have a program for educators though called [email protected] which works with educational institutions to provide Grammar tools for teachers and students. If you are interested in getting a [email protected] account, check it out here.

How do you get the discount?

  1. Click this link or the banner below:
    grammarly discount banner - grammarly review
  2. Look for this banner at the top:
  3. Click “Go Premium” and register for Grammarly Premium.

Should you get Grammarly Premium?

Grammarly Premium does offer a lot of great features that extend the functionality of the basic Grammarly and Grammarly Chrome plugin. We offer a great guide that walks you through the pros and cons of Grammarly Premium here.

Other Useful Articles:

  1. [2020 Update] Does Grammarly Offer a Free Trial?
  2. Grammarly Review 2020: A Writer’s Best Friend
  3. Grammarly vs. Ginger vs. Whitesmoke Review 2020

We enjoy travel. We see places we have never been, meet new people, see different cultures, see famous world historic sites and they help create memories. It creates joy and happiness from these memories.

While everything to do with travel is great, the spelling can make you annoyed and irritated. Travel is spelled the same universally but the confusion comes from “traveling and travelling”, “traveled and travelled” and “traveler and traveller”. These words create a lot of confusion for many people.

Is it Traveling or Travelling?

The answer is that it depends on your audience. The word “traveling” is mostly used in the USA and “travelling” is used in the UK and its commonwealth countries such as Australia. Many other words are different such as “color and colour”, “flavor and flavor” among many others.

The difference between the UK and USA English for this particular word is that for US English, whenever a word ends with a vowel and a consonant in that order the consonant is doubled only if stress in pronunciation falls on the final syllable. For instance, in the word “travel,” stress is on the first syllable there is no doubling of the letter l. Many other words share this fate.

You now know the spelling to use when writing an email, article or a college paper for someone or institution in the US you should use the shorter spelling traveling. If you are in the US and writing to someone in the commonwealth such as Australia you could choose to use the longer version which is what they use and prefer. Mixing the words may make you be called out for misspelling.

Examples:

At that time, I was traveling to Texas, USA when I met my colleague at the waiting lounge at Heathrow Airport.

He traveled all the way to the Mexican border by road, slept in a local motel before embarking on the journey by train to the capital.

The UK soccer team will be travelling by road to the training ground because the scheduled flight has been delayed.

She travelled to the South of London last evening to visit her ailing sister. She will be back in Liverpool on Monday.

As usual, the English language continues to have certain words whose meaning or spelling eludes us. However, in certain cases these questions are more interesting than they seem at first glance. Such is the case of today’s questions: what is the correct spelling of: lazer or laser?

Lasers used to be the stuff of science-fiction. They still reign there, but more modern technology has begun to use them. Our fascination and early knowledge still mostly originate from the worlds of fiction which might explain why so many people have come to spell lazer over laser. The letter z is one of those that is just everywhere in sci-fi. However in this case, that’s the wrong way to spell it.

Laser or Lazer?

To the question of lazer or laser we need to answer laser, every single time, in fact the word lazer isn’t even a word. Any reference to it you’ll find will only cover it as a misspelling of laser, so there’s definitely no room for questions or arguing with it. That does bring the question of what grammatical rule comes into play that gives laser the win in the battle of lazer or laser.

And the answer to this is well, none, the spelling of laser doesn’t come back to any etymological origins or deeper roots in the English language. Nor is it is written that way due to some obscure spelling rule, laser is just quite simply an acronym.

An acronym for those curious is a word that is formed by taking the first letters in a longer phrase, for example, the UN as an acronym of the United Nations. And for laser the word is an acronym of “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation” which refers to the way the beam of light is generated. So, in short, laser wasn’t really thought up originally as a real word. It was just an acronym that took off and happened to be easy enough to say in daily life.

That’s why in the matter of lazer or laser, we can never really use the spelling lazer. Regardless of how automatically it comes off the keyboard.

Grammarly used to offer a money-back guarantee for one week after you signed up for Grammarly Premium so you could cancel your subscription after using it for one week, but unfortunately, they have since done away with the free trial due to rampant abuse.

That said, there are still ways to get a trial of Grammarly Premium or receive a discounted price:

1. Sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program

If you sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program, you can request a one-month free trial of Grammarly Premium in order to test out the advanced features. If you then write an article about Grammarly and email the affiliate team, you can receive a $25 bonus!

grammarly trial - affiliates
Ask Grammarly for a free one-month trial of Grammarly Premium when you sign up for the affiliate program

2. Receive a 10% discount on Grammarly Premium

Capitalize My Title users get a 10% discount when they sign up for Grammarly Premium through our link or the banner below.

grammarly discount banner - grammarly review

How do you get a refund for Grammarly Premium?

Unfortunately, these days it is difficult to get a refund from Grammarly for your current payment period. Their policy, as of 30-August 2019, states that “If you cancel after your subscription renewal date, you will not receive a refund for any amounts that have been charged.” You can still try contacting their customer service, but don’t get your hopes up.

grammarly refund - terms and conditions
Grammarly’s Terms and Conditions as of 30-August 2019

Grammarly is our favorite grammar checking software. I use its in-browser automated proofreader to check my emails, blog articles, and everything else as I go. But does it work with Microsoft Word? Yes, in fact, it does! When Grammarly for Word was released, it made my daily editing a whole lot easier.

Does Grammarly Work With Microsoft Word?

Yes, Grammarly has a plug-in for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook. Just go to the Grammarly site and download the plug-in.

Once you’ve finished installing the plug-in, it will be an option in the Microsoft Word menu.  Just click on the “Open Grammarly” button in the top right.

grammarly microsoft word

The Grammarly menu will open on top and you will be able to see grammar errors in the right sidebar. Click on the errors to correct them and see an explanation for why they are errors.

How Does Grammarly’s Microsoft Word Plug-In Compare to Word’s Own Grammar Checker?

Microsoft Word’s grammar checker comes out of the box when you buy MS Office, but how does it compare to the Grammarly plug-in?

The main benefit of Grammarly is that it is regularly updated so you are always getting the most up-to-date grammar feedback. The free version comes with about 150 grammar checks. but you can get more by upgrading to premium.

Overall, it compares favorably to Microsoft Word’s own grammar checker, but it adds another layer of grammar checks to your writing so you can be sure your writing is the best it can be.

The best part is that you can get 10% off Grammarly Premium by installing Grammarly from the link below:

grammarly discount banner - grammarly review

The written word is built not only on proper spelling, but on proper punctuation too. It is no surprise, then, that when the world’s languages are expressed in written form, they feature letters (or characters), punctuation marks and special diacritics. We use these every day when we write physically. What you interpret as symbols, though, your computer interprets as binary code, systems of numbers, or encodings. Although these are mostly 1’s and 0’s, they form an intricate interface between our language and that of the machine. In the past, these encodings that helped computers to process symbols and characters were rather compact, making it difficult to represent all the world’s languages and their constituent symbols in text files. At some point, it was difficult to represent even English in a single encoding! Then came Unicode. But…

What is Unicode text?

Unicode is a Universal Character Encoding Standard. It specifies how characters are represented in text files, online webpages and many other types of documents. Above, we highlighted the more compact encoding standards of the past, a popular one being ASCII. Unlike ASCII, which was built around the English Language alone, Unicode was designed with the intent of representing symbols and characters from languages from all around the globe, with a support of about 1,000,000,000 different characters. True to Unicode’s advantage, ASCII supports only 128 characters. Essentially, Unicode text is capable of unambiguously representing any character, punctuation mark, diacritic from any of the world’s known and written languages.

encodingTo toy around with the idea, imagine what really happens when you change the font in a document. Those fancy, artsy looking characters that replace the bland, boring-looking default text are also a part of the specifications of your unicode text. Actually, among the hundreds of characters that constitute your Unicode text specifications exist variants of your current alphabet. These variants are linked to their equivalent normal alphabet so your computer knows exactly what to replace (and with what characters) when you select “Times New Roman” for example.

How it Works

As we mentioned earlier, your computer speaks the language of numbers, specifically binary code. In the case of character encodings, your computer assigns a number to each of the characters included in the Character Encoding Standard. Unicode provides each character with a unique number (think of it as the character’s ID) such that regardless of the platform or device on which the language is used, the character remains readily defined. Each character can be up to 4 bytes in size. To understand the implications of this size allowance, think back to how ASCII only supports 128 characters. It comes as no surprise given that ASCII uses only one byte per character. In essence, it has less “ID’s” to dedicate to individual characters than Unicode.

Popular Unicode Encodings

The most popular kinds of Unicode encodings are the UTF-8 and UTF-16 standards (although there are many other types of encodings). Many software programs and web pages now resort to the UTF-8 Standard as their standard encoding. You will find that although it supports up to 4 bytes per character, UTF-8 gives a lower memory allowance to the more commonly used characters. This is in the name of increasing efficiency. Therefore, characters of the English language are represented in one byte. Arabic, Latin and Hebrew characters are represented in 2 bytes and Asian characters are represented in three bytes. The full allowance of four bytes is usually reserved for any additional characters outside this scope.

Uniformity

The main advantage of Unicode is the uniformity it has brought to data interpretation the world over. Previously, text files and web pages were vulnerable to conflicting encodings that assigned the same number to different characters or different numbers to the same one! Computers were burdened with having to support multiple encodings to understand documents and web pages all while running the fervent risk of data corruption during transfers. With Unicode, the computing world has gained a sense of versatility in the cross platform compatibility of this Universal Character Encoding Standard. It facilitates an important part of the world’s main operating systems, browsers and search engines. In fact, the Internet and World-Wide Web owes the universality of character definition to Unicode.

We love using Grammarly for checking the grammar of our blog posts and emails. It is by far the best Grammar checker on the market and offers convenient tools like a Chrome plugin and extensions for Microsoft Office.

Is Grammarly free?

Yes, Grammarly is free to install, but it also has a Premium subscription if you wish to upgrade that includes over 250 extra grammar checks, a plagiarism checker, and various other style checks.

Can I get a discount for Grammarly Premium?

Yes. While Grammarly Premium can be a little bit pricey, we’ve negotiated a special Grammarly discount for CapitalizeMyTitle.com users. Clicking on the banner below will get you 10% percent off of Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

Grammarly Discount Code

Complement and compliment are homophones meaning they sound the same, but are spelled differently and have different meanings. This can be quite confusing when you are trying to figure out the right word to use in a sentence.

When it comes to complement vs compliment there are a number of things to break down. Let’s start with looking at the specific words themselves and then comparing and contrasting the two words.

What does “complement” mean?

Complement is often used to refer to something being added to something else to make it even better. For example, if you are wearing a nice dress you may put on some classy makeup to complement your appearance, or if you have a tasty cake you will complement it with some high-quality frosting to make it perfectly delicious. One other use of complement is when you have an assortment of something. Perhaps you have a full complement of drivers for your valet company, or a need a screwdriver to complete your complement of handyman tools.

What does “compliment” mean?

A compliment is when someone tells someone else something nice in an admiring manner. You can compliment someone on how beautiful they look today, or compliment a really juicy burger. When a compliment is given, it is directed at a specific person or item. A compliment can be given towards one thing or a bunch of things. The key element to it would be that it is expressing a positive thought.

Complement vs Compliment

As the above descriptions show, you could compliment how the frosting perfectly complements a cake, or observe that someone’s makeup complements their outfit in a complementary manner. When you are complimenting something it may very well be a complement to a person or object, but something does not have to be a complement to be complimented, that is a key point to take away. A compliment can be standalone, but a complement but its nature has something that it goes with to make it better.

We love using Grammarly for checking the grammar of our blog posts and emails. We highly recommend the free version, but Grammarly Premium version offers a lot of additional features that aren’t available in the free version. While it can be a little bit pricey, we’ve negotiated a special Grammarly discount for CapitalizeMyTitle.com users.

Clicking on the banner below will get you 10% percent off of Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

Grammarly Discount CodeClick the banner above to get your Grammarly discount

Many people wonder why or even whether there is an apostrophe in Mother’s Day. The simple answer is that there is an apostrophe in Mother’s Day andthe reason is quite simple.

Mother’s day was meant to celebrate the contribution of a mother to her family. Mother is not meant as a collective group here. It is a not a day to honor all the mothers in the world. It is a day to celebrate each mother as an individual.

That is why the apostrophe is after r and before s, so that it indicates that the mother is an individual. If the apostrophe was after s, then the meaning completely changes. For example, April Fool’s Day is a day for all the fools of the world. That is why the apostrophe is after L. If Mother’s Day were spelled Mothers’ Day, then the holiday would refer to a day for all the mothers in the world to celebrate together.

This is why you will see that people wish Happy Mother’s day to their mother only and not to everyone. It is different from other popular days like Christmas Day, where you wish everyone a happy day.

Grammarly has made installing their free Grammarly chrome plugin extremely simple. All you need to do to install the Grammarly Chrome plugin is follow the steps below. If you want to learn more about why we recommend Grammarly, read our Grammarly review.

 

How to Install the Grammarly Chrome Plugin

1. Go to Grammarly.com

Go to Grammarly’s website to get access to the Grammarly Chrome plugin.

 

2. Click on the “Add to Chrome – It’s Free” button

 

3. Authorize the Grammarly Chrome extension

When the popup opens that asks whether you want to “Add ‘Grammarly for Chrome,'” click “Add Extension.

Click “Add extension” to install the Grammarly Chrome plugin

 

4. Confirm installation of the Grammarly Chrome plugin

Make sure that the Grammarly logo appears in the top-right corner of your Chrome browser.

chrome grammarly

5. Upgrade to Grammarly Premium for over 400+ checks for common Grammar issues

Click on the banner below to get a Grammarly Premium discount of 10%:

grammarly discount banner 728 px

Grammarly is our favorite free grammar checker tool. We love the free version of Grammarly, but if you want to upgrade to Grammarly Premium, we have negotiated a special Grammarly discount for you. With our special link below you can get access to 10% percent off Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

Grammarly DiscountClick the banner above to get your Grammarly discount

Many people often wonder why or even whether there is an apostrophe in Father’s Day. There is an apostrophe in Father’s Day and the reason is quite simple.

Father’s day was meant to celebrate the contribution of a father to his family. Father is not meant as a collective group here. It is not a day to honor all the fathers in the world. It is a day to celebrate each father as an individual.

This is why the apostrophe is after r and before s, so that it indicates that the father is an individual. If the apostrophe was after s, then the meaning completely changes. For example, April Fool’s Day is a day for all the fools of the world. That is why the apostrophe is after L. If Father’s Day were spelled Fathers’ Day, then the holiday would refer to a day for all the fathers in the world to celebrate together.

This is why you will see that people wish Happy Father’s day to their father only and not to everyone. It is different from other popular days like Christmas Day, where you wish everyone.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

The main difference is that hung is used when referring to inanimate objects while hanged is used when referring to people.

You can read more about the differences in our article on the differences between hanged vs hung.

Grammarly

No, but you can still get a Grammarly discount on us. There is no Grammarly student discount through Grammarly’s website, but by clicking our banner below, you can get a Grammarly discount all the same. It’s like having a Grammarly student discount after all!

grammarly discount banner - grammarly review

 

Grammarly does have a program for educators though called [email protected] which works with educational institutions to provide Grammar tools for teachers and students. If you are interested in getting a [email protected] account, check it out here.

How do you get the discount?

  1. Click this link or the banner below:
    grammarly discount banner - grammarly review
  2. Look for this banner at the top:
  3. Click “Go Premium” and register for Grammarly Premium.

Should you get Grammarly Premium?

Grammarly Premium does offer a lot of great features that extend the functionality of the basic Grammarly and Grammarly Chrome plugin. We offer a great guide that walks you through the pros and cons of Grammarly Premium here.

Other Useful Articles:

  1. [2020 Update] Does Grammarly Offer a Free Trial?
  2. Grammarly Review 2020: A Writer’s Best Friend
  3. Grammarly vs. Ginger vs. Whitesmoke Review 2020

Grammarly used to offer a money-back guarantee for one week after you signed up for Grammarly Premium so you could cancel your subscription after using it for one week, but unfortunately, they have since done away with the free trial due to rampant abuse.

That said, there are still ways to get a trial of Grammarly Premium or receive a discounted price:

1. Sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program

If you sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program, you can request a one-month free trial of Grammarly Premium in order to test out the advanced features. If you then write an article about Grammarly and email the affiliate team, you can receive a $25 bonus!

grammarly trial - affiliates
Ask Grammarly for a free one-month trial of Grammarly Premium when you sign up for the affiliate program

2. Receive a 10% discount on Grammarly Premium

Capitalize My Title users get a 10% discount when they sign up for Grammarly Premium through our link or the banner below.

grammarly discount banner - grammarly review

How do you get a refund for Grammarly Premium?

Unfortunately, these days it is difficult to get a refund from Grammarly for your current payment period. Their policy, as of 30-August 2019, states that “If you cancel after your subscription renewal date, you will not receive a refund for any amounts that have been charged.” You can still try contacting their customer service, but don’t get your hopes up.

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Grammarly’s Terms and Conditions as of 30-August 2019

Some questions invariably have an easier time being answered than others; it’s just a fact of life. And even when the topic is capitalization this remains true. Grammar can be complex, and English definitely is, so a lot of interesting and tough questions can arise easily. But today’s question is particularly tricky, so it’s better you pay close attention, as we try to answer…

Is Civil War Capitalized?

In most cases, the answer is a simple no, and that can be explained with the basic rules of capitalization. Words only need to be capitalized when they are at the start of the sentence, or when they are a proper noun, a word that refers to a proper title or name.

The word civil war on its own isn’t a proper noun, a civil war is just a kind of conflict, not any more specific than a football match or a movie screening. Civil war is never a proper noun on its own, so it should only be capitalized at the start of a sentence like in this one.

However there are many specific events and titles that use the words civil war, and in those cases, the entire title becomes a proper noun. If we talk about the famous movie Captain America Civil War we need to capitalize it, as the entire title is the proper name of the film. If the topic at hand is the American Civil War or the Spanish Civil War the situation repeats. This is because they are the proper names of a specific event and not just a civil war. A common usage of the word particularly in American articles is to shorten the American Civil War to just the Civil War, in this example the word is used explicitly as a synonym of the proper noun American Civil War, so it gets capitalized once again.

In short, civil war is not a word that is capitalized on its own, but as it’s very often used as part of proper titles it gets capitalized a lot. It’s just important to remember that this isn’t due to any special trait of the word civil war, but just due to the role it fulfills.

Grammarly is our favorite grammar checking software. I use its in-browser automated proofreader to check my emails, blog articles, and everything else as I go. But does it work with Microsoft Word? Yes, in fact, it does! When Grammarly for Word was released, it made my daily editing a whole lot easier.

Does Grammarly Work With Microsoft Word?

Yes, Grammarly has a plug-in for Microsoft Word and Microsoft Outlook. Just go to the Grammarly site and download the plug-in.

Once you’ve finished installing the plug-in, it will be an option in the Microsoft Word menu.  Just click on the “Open Grammarly” button in the top right.

grammarly microsoft word

The Grammarly menu will open on top and you will be able to see grammar errors in the right sidebar. Click on the errors to correct them and see an explanation for why they are errors.

How Does Grammarly’s Microsoft Word Plug-In Compare to Word’s Own Grammar Checker?

Microsoft Word’s grammar checker comes out of the box when you buy MS Office, but how does it compare to the Grammarly plug-in?

The main benefit of Grammarly is that it is regularly updated so you are always getting the most up-to-date grammar feedback. The free version comes with about 150 grammar checks. but you can get more by upgrading to premium.

Overall, it compares favorably to Microsoft Word’s own grammar checker, but it adds another layer of grammar checks to your writing so you can be sure your writing is the best it can be.

The best part is that you can get 10% off Grammarly Premium by installing Grammarly from the link below:

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We love using Grammarly for checking the grammar of our blog posts and emails. It is by far the best Grammar checker on the market and offers convenient tools like a Chrome plugin and extensions for Microsoft Office.

Is Grammarly free?

Yes, Grammarly is free to install, but it also has a Premium subscription if you wish to upgrade that includes over 250 extra grammar checks, a plagiarism checker, and various other style checks.

Can I get a discount for Grammarly Premium?

Yes. While Grammarly Premium can be a little bit pricey, we’ve negotiated a special Grammarly discount for CapitalizeMyTitle.com users. Clicking on the banner below will get you 10% percent off of Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

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We love using Grammarly for checking the grammar of our blog posts and emails. We highly recommend the free version, but Grammarly Premium version offers a lot of additional features that aren’t available in the free version. While it can be a little bit pricey, we’ve negotiated a special Grammarly discount for CapitalizeMyTitle.com users.

Clicking on the banner below will get you 10% percent off of Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

Grammarly Discount CodeClick the banner above to get your Grammarly discount

Grammarly has made installing their free Grammarly chrome plugin extremely simple. All you need to do to install the Grammarly Chrome plugin is follow the steps below. If you want to learn more about why we recommend Grammarly, read our Grammarly review.

 

How to Install the Grammarly Chrome Plugin

1. Go to Grammarly.com

Go to Grammarly’s website to get access to the Grammarly Chrome plugin.

 

2. Click on the “Add to Chrome – It’s Free” button

 

3. Authorize the Grammarly Chrome extension

When the popup opens that asks whether you want to “Add ‘Grammarly for Chrome,'” click “Add Extension.

Click “Add extension” to install the Grammarly Chrome plugin

 

4. Confirm installation of the Grammarly Chrome plugin

Make sure that the Grammarly logo appears in the top-right corner of your Chrome browser.

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5. Upgrade to Grammarly Premium for over 400+ checks for common Grammar issues

Click on the banner below to get a Grammarly Premium discount of 10%:

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Grammarly is our favorite free grammar checker tool. We love the free version of Grammarly, but if you want to upgrade to Grammarly Premium, we have negotiated a special Grammarly discount for you. With our special link below you can get access to 10% percent off Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

Grammarly DiscountClick the banner above to get your Grammarly discount

Greetings

Whether you’re saying farewell to a spouse for the day, dropping your kids off at the school bus, or wishing your neighbor a great day as you pull out of your driveway, wishing someone “have a great day” is apt to start them off in a great mood.

Other Ways to Say “Have a Great Day”

There are a number of ways to say “Have a Great Day” to someone. Read on to learn about these alternatives:

Have a good day!

Have an awesome day!

I hope your day is great!

Today will be the best!

Have a splendid day!

Have a nice day.

Have a pleasant day.

Have a Rock-and-Roll Day!

In Other Languages:

(Spanish) ¡Que tengas un gran día!

(Italian) Vi auguro una buona giornata!

(German) Ich wünsche ihnen einen wunderbaren Tag!

(Russian) Хорошего дня!

(Japanese) すてきな一日を!

(Chinese) 祝你有美好的一天!

Motivational Great Day Sayings for a Loved One

Sending a loved one off to work or school sometimes calls for variation in what you say. Not every day will be a great one for them, but also they will tire of the same phrase every day. Here are some other messages you can do to wish a good day!

1. You are the best and I know you will try your hardest at work today. Go forth and do wonders!

2. Even the more complicated tasks can be overcome if we just try. The key to success is perseverance, so make the most of this day and put your best foot forward.

3. This is a new day which gives you the chance to try different things. Dare to make some change in the world!

4. May you be blessed with lots of compassion and opportunities as you start your new day.

5. The secret behind a great day is a great attitude.

6. Have a nice day dear. Your happiness is my happiness!

7. I hope you have a wonderful day.

8. Have a ridiculously awesome day, sunshine!

9. Be great for no reason.

10. You are going to be awesome today!

Quotes About a Great Day

1. “For me, a lovely day is any day I wake up” – Bernie Siegel

2. “Good news equals good day.” – Unknown

3. “Joyful morning, good morning, good day.” – Unknown

4. “This is a wonderful day, I have never seen this one before.” – Maya Angelou

5. “A good day is a good day. A bad day is a good story.” – Glennon Melton

6. “If you don’t think every day is a good day, just try missing one. ” – Cavett Robert

7. “Take each good day and relish each moment. Take each bad day and work to make it good.” – Lisa Dado

8. “It’s a great day to be alive. I know the sun’s still shining when I close my eyes.” – Travis Tritt

9. “Good days are the days when you are able to positively influence the people around you.” – Unknown

10. “A day is a day. It’s just a measurement of time. Whether it’s a good day or a bad day is up to you. It’s all a matter of perception.” – Donald L. Hicks

Is Have a Great Day Capitalized?

No, when used in a regular sentence or greeting, “have a great” day is not capitalized. This includes email salutations or greetings. You should only capitalize the “h” in “have” if it is the beginning of the sentence.

The exception to this rule is if “have a great day” is part of a title. Then it follows standard title capitalization rules and is capitalized.

Productivity

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo that involves a series of work sprints where you work for a set period of time (15-30 minutes) and then taking a break short break (5-10 minutes).

The name Pomodoro Technique comes from the word pomodoro, from the Italian word for ‘tomato‘, which is what the original kitchen timers Cirillo used resembled when he first created the technique.

What are the benefits of the Pomodoro Technique?

The intent is that you focus intently on a task for the working period and don’t get distracted because you know that a break is coming up shortly. Normally, it’s easy to stop working when you feel stuck or need to go to the bathroom.

The Pomodoro Technique lets you avoid these distractions since you know that you’ll get a break within a few minutes. It can also help you break through challenges because you are forced to continue working until the time expires.

Do you have any recommended tools to leverage the Pomodoro Technique?

We love the Tomato Timer because it’s a dead-simple online tool and has preset “short” and “long” break timers. It has a set 25-minute working block that can’t be adjusted, but this time works for us. There are plenty of other phone apps and online tools to use the technique or you can just use a simple kitchen timer.

Read More:

SEO

SEMRush paid packages are quite expensive, so we wanted to give you some alternatives that are either free or a lot cheaper than SEMRush. Below we have a great list of SEMRush alternatives.

SEMRush alternatives

Mangools (KWFinder, SiteProfiler, etc)

Mangools is my favorite keyword research and SERP monitoring tool. I’ve been using the paid version for over two years now and attribute this site’s growth to it. It provides a very easy-to-understand interface to tell which keywords to use new articles.

Mangools’ package includes a suite of 5 tools where SiteProfiler is the most similar to SEMRush. You can sign up for a free 10-day trial here.

siteprofiler - capitalize my title

 

They offer several tools besides a keyword research tool including:

  • KWFinder: A keyword research and planner tool.
  • SERPWatcher: Track how your domain ranks overtime on keywords you define.
  • SiteProfiler: See traffic overviews of a specific domain. This is the tool that is most similar to SEMRush.

Google Keyword Planner

If you are looking for just a keyword planner tool, Google’s Keyword Planner Tool (part of AdWords) is a great starter tool. It only shows you high-level keyword ranges unless you pay for ad campaigns.

adwords hiking

Ahrefs

Ahrefs is another alternative to SEMRush and offers similar functionality for a similar price. The cheapest package starts at $82/mo for an annual plan which is only a $1 cheaper than SEMRush at the time of this writing. Like SEMRush, it lets you track keywords for domains, maintain projects, and do competitive analysis.

ahrefs screen

Ubersuggest

Ubersuggest is Neil Patel’s free keyword suggestion tool built out of frustration over all of the expensive keyword research tools on the market. If you enter a domain name, you can use it similarly to SEMRush and see a site profile full of traffic details and keyword rankings.

uber suggest site profileuber suggest site profile - keywords

Moz

Moz offers a ton of SEO tools including a domain overview tool similar to SEMRush. You can see top backlinks, keywords, and more all for free.

moz - domain overview

moz - domain overview - keywords

Buzzsumo

Buzzsumo is a favorite tool among marketers because of it’s great content suggestions. It can be used as a starting point for keyword research, but also gives some good insights about websites. While the data that’s available for free isn’t as robust as some of the tools above provide, it does offer some unique perspectives for free such as top shared articles.

buzzsumo - keyword research

SEMRush is a great SEO analytics platform, but it can be quite costly. As of this writing, the cheapest paid plan is $83/mo if paying for an annual plan. The great thing is that you can use many of its features for free and all you need is an account! In this article, I’ll walk you through how to sign up for SEMRush for free so that you can do keyword and competitive research for free.

How to Get a Free SEMRush Account

Step 1: Get an SEMRush Account for Free

Getting a free SEMRush account is relatively simple. All you need to do is go to this link, enter a domain name you want to analyze, and click “Get Insights.”

semrush traffic analyticsYou’ll be prompted to “Register” to create an account or login in with an existing account. Just fill out your email address and password under the “Register” tab and click “Create My Account.”

semrush create account

Once you’ve verified your account, you’ll be able to return to SEMRush and log in.

Step 2: Log In to SEMRush

Depending on you verified your account and logged in, you may be taken to different pages. For simplicity, you can click on the button below to start again from the page at the beginning so that you can continue following the tutorial below.

Step 3: View Traffic Analysis

You should be brought to the “Traffic Analytics” page for whatever domain name you entered. This page provides a lot of great insights about the domain name including estyimated monthly visitors, average visit duration, geographic location of audience, and other stats you would typically find in Google Analytics (if you had access to a site’s GA account).

semrush traffic analysis - capitalize my titleThe accuracy of this data is obviously in question since SEMRush also does not have access to Google Analytics so it tries to estimate a best guess based on search volume data for the keywords it knows the website ranks for in SERPs. However, it tends to provide great directional data. SEMRush tends to report a 50% reduction to Capitalize My Title’s actual traffic.

The best part about this Traffic Analysis is that you can get it with a free SEMRush account!

Step 4: Check the Domain Overview

The other great feature you have access to with a free SEMRush account is the “Domain Overview” which provides a snapshot of the competitive positioning of the domain.  Just click on “Domain Overview” in the left sidebar to reach this amazing resource.

semrush domain analysis - capitalize my titleAs you can see on this page, the “Organic Search” metrics gives you a different measure of traffic compared to the “Traffic Analytics” page. Here, SEMRush is trying to estimate the organic search volume the domain receives each month. It also shows you how much “Paid Search” contributes to a domain’s traffic.

If you’re doing the math, the 130K “Organic Search” on this page and 274K “Visits” metric above do not match. Since the “Domain Overview” metric is 0, the difference is coming from direct traffic (people who directly visit the website by typing in the domain name).

Scrolling down the page, you can find a competitive analysis show how the domain ranks for top keywords and who its main competitors are.

organic keywords and competitors

Step 5: View Top 10 Keywords for Free

By clicking on “View Full Report” under the “Top Organic Keywords” section, you can view the top 10 keywords for the domain. An added benefit is that you should be able to sort some of the columns for free to get a bit more insight for free.
top keywords - capitalize my title - semrush

Is a Paid SEMRush Account Worth It?

As of this writing, SEMRush offered 3 account and pricing options. You can see the options below:

semrush pricingIf you’re really invested in growing the SEO and organic traffic of your website, I recommend SEMRush because its powerful tools provide a ton of value for competitive research and keyword tracking. However, there are cheaper alternatives like KWFinder which provide similar value.

Styles

Sentence case is a style of capitalization used by many of the popular style formats including Chicago, MLA, APA, and AP. It is a popular capitalization choice for newspapers and subheadings.

What Is Sentence Case?

To use sentence case capitalization, you should only capitalize the first word of a sentence and any proper nouns. Our free title capitalization tool has the option for sentence case for each capitalization style so you can quickly format a title in sentence case.

Sentence case is the preferred headline capitalization style for newspapers and online journals in the US and UK. It is sometimes referred to as “down style” and “reference style.” In fact, if you go to CNN.com right now, I bet you’ll see all of the headlines in sentence case.

Sentence case is also commonly used in subheadings for journals and articles. Title case is used for the main header and then sentence case is used for the smaller headings.

Using Sentence Case in Microsoft Office

Sentence case is available as a capitalization option in Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Just go to the “Home” tab and click on the “Change Case” option as in the screenshot below:

Titles are hard to come up with. Every writer or editor will tell you that. But what is also the trick is to figure out just how to capitalize one as well. There are four main styles of capitalizing a title. We won’t get too much into them here. But we can extract some basic guidelines from them and figure out the answer to the question:

Is “From” Capitalized in a Title?

The times when “from” is capitalized in a title

When we extract the common rules or tendencies from those four main styles of title capitalization, we know that the first word of a sentence is capitalized so “from” is capitalized if it is the first word of a sentence. The word “from” is capitalized in the middle of a title if you are using APA, AP, or MLA title capitalization styles in title case.

The following examples show the affirmative answer to the question, is “from” capitalized in a title:

  • “From a Brother to a Brother”
  • “The Answer to the Question, Where Does it All Come From?”
  • “From the Remains of Native Americans”
  • “From an Another Dimension”
  • “Places Where Joy Comes From”
  • “From Now on There Are New Rules in the World of Fitness.”

The times when “from” is written in lowercase in a title

If you are using sentence case or you are using the Chicago Manual of Style style guide, then you should lowercase the word “from.” 

The style you are using should guide you on how to format your movie title. Formatting and capitalization in the different methods vary. These styles include the Chicago formatting style, American Psychological Association, and Modern Language Association techniques which all place titles of movies in italics. Other styles such as the Associated Press (AP) usually adopt quotations for movie titles.

About a movie title in the body of a given work or paper, all the listed styles above use title casing in that all the keywords within the work’s title are capitalized.

Do you underline movie titles?

In APA, MLA and Chicago styles, film or movie titles are formatted the same. In each of these styles, you should not underline movie titles – instead, they should be written in italics in the body of the text. An instance of this is as outlined below:

Avengers: Endgame
 has received heavy critic reviews for satisfying the past to deliver nothing short of a thrilling and emotional conclusion to superhero adventure.

The APA, MLA, and Chicago styles all use the case capitalization for the movie titles. All wordings, from nouns to pronouns, adjectives, verbs to adverbs are all capitalized. Nonetheless, minor wording such as conjunctions and prepositions use the lower case in the text unless they are the beginning words in the title.

It is a rule that under APA, all words that have more than four letters should be capitalized. For instance: Rick and Morty. In the reference lists, APA employs sentence case capitalization which translates that only the first words of the title, for example: For Whom the bell tolls and proper nouns such as place names and people names should be capitalized.

Under the AP style, the titles of movies are put in quotations. It is worth mentioning that standard rules for quotes within other quotes still apply. A good instance of this is:
The 2019 “Avengers: Endgame” broke the IMAX and Box office worldwide opening record to beat “Star Wars” which was the previous record holder.

Title Capitalization

Sentence case is a style of capitalization used by many of the popular style formats including Chicago, MLA, APA, and AP. It is a popular capitalization choice for newspapers and subheadings.

What Is Sentence Case?

To use sentence case capitalization, you should only capitalize the first word of a sentence and any proper nouns. Our free title capitalization tool has the option for sentence case for each capitalization style so you can quickly format a title in sentence case.

Sentence case is the preferred headline capitalization style for newspapers and online journals in the US and UK. It is sometimes referred to as “down style” and “reference style.” In fact, if you go to CNN.com right now, I bet you’ll see all of the headlines in sentence case.

Sentence case is also commonly used in subheadings for journals and articles. Title case is used for the main header and then sentence case is used for the smaller headings.

Using Sentence Case in Microsoft Office

Sentence case is available as a capitalization option in Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Just go to the “Home” tab and click on the “Change Case” option as in the screenshot below:

The rules of grammar may sometimes appear not to be very structured when it comes to writing in the English language. When one rule applies at one point, it may not apply if the conditions of the text change very slightly. We are going to explore the question of whether nationalities are capitalized. We know that when writing in English, place names such as countries or towns are always capitalized, but does this extend to nationalities?

Are nationalities capitalized?

In short, the answer to this question is yes. When referring to someone’s nationality within written English, you should always begin the nationality with a capital letter. This includes when nationality is mentioned both at the start of a sentence and when it is placed elsewhere within it.

It is important to remember that the word nationality itself is never capitalized unless appearing at the very start of a sentence.

Examples

To demonstrate how the capitalization of nationalities within written English works, here are some examples of sentences.

  • I wasn’t sure whether she was Spanish or Italian.
  • Claire is American.
  • There are many countries in the continent of Africa, I was not certain which one he came from. He could have been Kenyan, South African, Tanzanian, Senegalese or any of the other nationalities from the continent.
  • For those born in South America, they could be any one of the following nationalities; Argentinian, Brazilian, Chilean, Peruvian or many others.

This is an example of a conversation featuring a number of nationalities.

“Do you know where Larry is from?”

“I’m not sure, perhaps he is Austrian?”

“No, I don’t think he is, he could be Polish?”

“Maybe he is, but I’m sure I heard someone say he was Russian.”

New Additions to Style Guides: Black and Indigenous

Due to renewed focus on the Black Lives Matter movement in May/June 2020, the AP Stylebook has decided to now capitalize the word “Black” when referring to people who identify as Black, including those in the African diaspora and within Africa.

Additionally, the AP has decided to capitalize the word “Indigenous” when referring to original inhabitants of a place.

Other Nationalities that Should be Capitalized

    • American
    • Asian
    • Asian American
    • Australian
    • Austrian
    • Belarusian
    • Belgian
    • Brazilian
    • British
    • Bulgarian
    • Canadian
    • Chinese
    • Czech
    • Danish
    • Dutch
    • Egyptian
    • Estonian
    • Finnish
    • French
    • Georgian
    • German
    • Greek
    • Hungarian
    • Indian
    • Irish
    • Israeli
    • Italian
    • Japanese
    • Korean
    • Latino
    • Latvian
    • Lithuanian
    • Mexican
    • Native American
    • New Zealander
    • Norwegian
    • Polish
    • Portuguese
    • Romanian
    • Russian
    • Scottish
    • Slovak / Slovakian
    • South African
    • Spanish
    • Swedish
    • Swiss
    • Turkish
    • Ukrainian
    • Welsh

Conclusion

When writing in English, a nationality is always capitalized. They always begin with a capital letter regardless of their placement within a sentence. There are never any exceptions to this rule.

Related Articles

According to a majority of American manuals, terms referring to ethnic groups must be capitalized since they are proper nouns. This includes the phrase African American.

The term African American is widely accepted as a color term referring to an ethnic group whose members are of African descent. So, the answer to the question “Is African American Capitalized in a sentence?” is yes.

When African American is used in a main heading or title, it should be capitalized. An example of such a title is “Roots: The Saga of an American Family” when used in a book title.

Is Black Capitalized?

Historically, the word “black” was lowercase even when referring to people who identify as Black, including those in the African diaspora and within Africa. However, the AP Stylebook has recently made a change to capitalize the word “Black” when referring to this group of people.

Do you hyphenate African American?

Sometimes people hyphenate the word African-American, which is also grammatically correct. Other synonyms of African American that people usually capitalize include: Black American, and Afro-American. There are no exceptions where the compound word African-American is not capitalized. Some people capitalize the word African and forget to capitalize the second part “American” especially when they hyphenate the compound word. Remember to always capitalize both words before and after the hyphen.
For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

 

Related Articles:

We always capitalize days of the week and months of the year in writing. However, when it comes to seasons of the year, we don’t capitalize the name of the season. If we did, we would have to capitalize every particular time period, even those occurring throughout the day, like morning and afternoon. This would look absurd and get quite confusing.

Are Seasons Capitalized?

No, seasons are not generally capitalized.

Seasons, such as fall, spring, winter, and summer are general nouns, not proper nouns so therefore seasons shouldn’t be capitalized. Days of the week and months of the year are proper nouns instead so they are always capitalized. Therefore, the capitalization that applies to proper nouns isn’t applicable to seasons.

When Do You Capitalize Seasons?

There are situations, however, when you should capitalize seasons. For example, at the beginning of a sentence where the rule of the capitalizing the first letter applies (E.g.: Summer is the best season of the year, but fall is not). Other examples of when you can capitalize fall are when the season forms part of a proper noun, or when it’s a part of a title. For example, in ‘Fall Games’ or ‘Fall Semester.’

Another example is when seasons are personified in a piece of creative writing, such as in poems. But this only applies when seasons are given life in such writing.

Overall, the general rule is that we don’t capitalize seasons, fall included.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Historically, the word internet was capitalized since it is a proper noun, but in the last few years the trend has been to lowercase the word internet since it is now a general noun.

Update: In 2016, Associated Press editors decided to reverse a long-standing tradition of capitalizing the word Internet. Since 2016, the AP stylebook now recommends lowercasing “internet” and “web.”

Is Internet Capitalized or Not?

There is continual debate around whether the word Internet should continue to be capitalized since it has established itself into everyday life. Since the AP Stylebook announcement in 2016, the trend across style guides has been to lowercase the word internet.

In fact, the UK has mostly transitioned to referring the to Internet with a lowercase “i” as you can see in this study done by Oxford Dictionaries. In the US, about 65% of the population refers to Internet with a capital “I” versus in the UK, only about 25% of the population uses a capital “I.” In fact, the earliest use of the word, cited in the Oxford English Dictionary from 1974, was with a lowercase i since at that time there were multiple internets.

Is World Wide Web Capitalized?

“The World Wide Web,” often used to mean the same thing as “internet,” is the formal name of the internet as we know it today invented by Tim Berners-Lee. It also goes by “The Web” for short. According to the MLA style guide, both “The World Wide Web” and “The Web” should be capitalized since they are proper nouns.

 

While the debate continues, you should always follow the standard title capitalization rules for capitalizing titles regardless of the outcome of the Internet debate.

To understand if the phrase “white house” is capitalized, we need to first establish what a proper noun is. A proper noun refers to a name that describes a particular entity or thing. Such names could, therefore, refer to a name, title, or a specific place such as a school or the presidential residence. It for that reason that the “White House” is a proper noun and therefore should be capitalized since it refers to the U.S President’s residence. On the other hand, collective nouns are usually written in lowercase since they are used to refer to a variety of things, such as the assembly of the white-colored building in New York.

Is “White House” Capitalized?

One of the reasons why word capitalization matters are because the meaning of a word can change significantly depending on whether it has been capitalized or not. Whether a name is lowercase or uppercase determines its purpose in a sentence. For instance, consider this sentence to understand when is white house capitalized. Well, “my brother works in the white house.” This sentence is quite different from, “My brother work in the White House.” The second sentence with a capital “W’ and “H” means that his brother works in a specific place that is the U.S. President’s residence [THE White House]. The first sentence with lowercase “w” and “h” refers to a general white house where his brother works.

Word Capitalizing in Headings and Titles

You should capitalize most words in headings and titles. You can find the official rules for title capitalization here. For instance, The History of White House. The first and the last words in a subtitle or the title.

 

You may have seen the words ‘stock market’ capitalized in some things you have read but not others. You may now be wondering which is the correct way to write it. This is what we want to help you with here. We want to definitively answer the question ‘is stock market capitalized’?

Is ‘Stock Market’ a Place?

A lot of grammatical rules in relation to capitalization will hinge on whether something is a place name or not. This can lead to a lot of confusion. After all, a stock market is a physical place, right? This means that we first need to establish whether ‘stock market’ is the official name of a place or not. We know that it is a physical place, but this isn’t enough. It absolutely must be the name of a place.

The answer is that there are no places that use the official name ‘stock market’. The official name of a stock market will likely always be ‘Stock Exchange’ e.g. NYSE is the New York Stock Exchange and LSE will be the London Stock Exchange. There is no such thing as ‘New York Stock Market’ or ‘London Stock Market’. The stock market is simply the thing that is being operated under these official names, whether in relation to a specific market or looking at stock markets as a whole throughout the world.

Is Stock Market Capitalized?

The phrase ‘stock market’ will never be capitalized in a sentence. So, for example, if you were talking about the ‘New York Stock Exchange’ but wanted to be a bit more informal, then you may say ‘New York stock market’. That is it. However, if you want to be a touch more professional in your writing, you would simply say the former anyway. Most of the time you would say ‘stock market’ is if it was in a sentence on its own. Obviously, it would never be capitalized there.

There may be small exceptions to this rule. However, these will not be grammatical exceptions, they will be purely stylistic. For example, if you are writing a title to an article, and you capitalize every other word in that title, then of course ‘stock market’ would be capitalized. However, if no other words are capitalized, then ‘stock market’ shouldn’t be. This is for the same reasons as before. It is not a ‘place name’.

Title capitalization in English can be challenging since different words have different rules for capitalization. “Library is one of those words that can be quite confusing.

Is the Word ‘Library’ Capitalized?

This confusion is mainly due to the fact that the answer to this question is a nuanced one. Namely, you can distinguish two scenarios and those scenarios are very different from each other when it comes to capitalizing the word ‘library’.

In the first scenario, the word ‘library’ is used as a proper noun and proper nouns are always capitalized in English. If this is the case, we’re talking about a library in the form of a very specific building, such as the British Library, which you can find in London. Because this is such a specific library that even has a name to indicate which building we’re talking about, the word ‘Library’ is a proper noun in this context. To make this less abstract in an example sentence: “I’ve always wanted to visit the Library of Congress in Washington, seeing as it’s supposed to be very big and stunning!”

The second scenario is when the word ‘library’ is used generically in which case it is lowercase. When you use the word ‘library’ in the second scenario, the grammar rules that apply are entirely different. More concretely, when we’re using the word ‘library’ in this scenario, we’re not talking about a very specific building or such, but you’re just talking about the library as a general public facility. When this is the case, the word ‘library’ doesn’t function as a proper noun, but instead, it functions as a regular common noun. As a result, you won’t need to capitalize the letter ‘l’ in the word ‘library’, unless you’re starting your sentence with this word. Namely, there’s a general rule in the English language that you never should capitalize the first letter of common nouns, unless you’re starting your sentence with the common noun!

To give you an example sentence: “I’m thinking about going to the library because I’m in the mood to do some reading.”

Thus, if you’re not sure whether you need to capitalize the word ‘library’ or not, you just need to ask yourself the question whether you’re talking about specific libraries or whether you’re just talking about libraries in the general sense of the word! If you’re talking about specific libraries, you will need to use capitalization and if you’re talking about libraries as a public facility, you won’t need to use capitalization!

Understanding the rules of capitalization can be challenging since the rules depend on the context of the sentence. The word “global” is no exception.

Is Global Capitalized?

In general, the word “global” is lowercase except in three instances. The first instance of when “global” should be capitalized is when used as the first word in a sentence. For example, “Global is a proper noun.”

The second instance when you should capitalize the word “global” is when the word is used as a part of a proper noun. This is mainly because “global” in this scenario is a proper noun just like Jupiter, Pluto, or the Pacific Ocean.

The final instance when the word “global” is capitalized is when used in a title. Be it that of an article, a book, or any other written text. An example of such a case is a newspaper headlined “Global Warming Is Destroying the Earth” or “The Global Pandemic Has Ended.”

Is Globe Capitalized?

The word “globe” follows the same capitalization rules as “global” and is only capitalized in the three scenarios above.

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To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

The coronavirus pandemic has spread quickly across the globe in 2020 and we want to make sure that news sources are capitalizing the disease correctly when reporting on it.

Is COVID-19 Capitalized?

As we did in our headline on this page, the Associated Press says that the abbreviated name of the disease should be written in all capital letters as “COVID-19” which is short for “coronavirus disease 2019.”

This is also true for the official name of the disease “SARS-CoV-2” except that the “o” in this name is lowercase.

You should also capitalize other coronavirus diseases include “SARS” (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and “MERS” (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome).

Is Coronavirus Capitalized?

Even when referring to the novel (new) coronavirus, you should not capitalize coronavirus unless used in a headline or abbreviated to “COVID-19.”

The word “coronavirus” can refer to a number of different viruses ranging from the common cold to the 2019 novel coronavirus. Since there are a number of coronavirus variants, coronavirus is usually lowercase except when used in a headline.

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To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Sometimes, it can be hard to know whether you are supposed to capitalize certain words or not. “Maid of Honor” is an example of a phrase where there seems to be a lot of confusion as to whether it needs to be capitalized or not.

Should “Maid of Honor” be Capitalized?

Yes, “Maid of Honor” needs to be capitalized. Let me tell you the reasons for this.

“Maid of Honor” is used to refer to a woman that’s a big part of a wedding party and therefore, “Maid of Honor” is an example of a specific wedding title. A wedding title is a subcategory of the more general category of titles. There is a general rule in the English language that titles need to be capitalized at all times and thus, ‘Maid of Honor” is no exception.

The reason for this is that titles are used in formal settings such as weddings and those kinds of occasions justify the use of capitalization. However, it should be noted that “of” is the only part of the wedding title that doesn’t need to be capitalized according to the capitalization rules of the English language. Namely, “of” is an example of a preposition and it’s a general rule that prepositions are never capitalized when they are used in a title. “Maid” and “Honor” on the other hand are both nouns in the title and thus they do need to be capitalized.

To make this less abstract, I will demonstrate these general rules of capitalization in a sentence: “Mary has known Julie since they were kids and that’s why she decided to make her the Maid of Honor at her wedding.”

In this sentence, Julie is granted the prominent wedding title of “Maid of Honor” and thus, this set of words needs to be capitalized.

Should “Matron of Honor” be Capitalized?

Matron of Honor,” a “Maid of Honor” who is married, should follow the same capitalization rules as “Maid of Honor” since it is also a wedding title.

One of the reasons why word capitalization matters are because the meaning of a word can change significantly depending on whether it has been capitalized or not. Whether a name is lowercase or uppercase determines its purpose in a sentence. This can also be confusing when using the phrase “white house.”

Is White House Capitalized?

Whether “white house” is capitalized depends on whether it is being used as a proper noun or a common noun.

For instance, consider this sentence to understand when is white house capitalized.

My brother works in the white house.

This sentence is quite different from

My brother works in the White House.

The next sentence with capital W’ and H’ means that his brother works in a specific place that is the U.S president’s residence the White House. The previous sentence with lower “w and “h” refers to a general place known as the white house where his brother works.

Proper vs. Common Nouns

What is a proper noun? A proper noun refers to a name that describes a particular entity or thing. Such names could, therefore, refer to a name, title, or a specific place such as a school or the presidential residence. It for that reason that the White House is a proper noun and therefore should be capitalized since it refers to the U.S president’s residence. On the other hand, collective nouns are usually written in lowercase since they are used to refer to a variety of things, such as the assembly of the white-colored building in New York.

Word Capitalizing in Headings and Titles

On the other hand, capitalizing words in headings and titles depends on the following. All words with four-letter or more. For instance, The History of the White House. The first and the last words in a subtitle or the title. Is the White House is the President’s Official Residential?

The rules that govern which word to capitalize in a sentence are quite simple as opposed to capitalizing headings or titles. For instance, all proper nouns in a sentence should be capitalized no matter where they appear in a sentence. On the other hand, collective nouns are written in lower case in a sentence.

Other FAQs:

Is Senate Capitalized?
Are Government Department Names and Positions Capitalized?
Capital vs Capitol
Is Government Capitalized?

With the current crisis going on all over the world, it can be obvious to ask the question of whether the word pandemic is capitalized?

Is Pandemic Capitalized?

Generally, no. The word pandemic is a generic noun which means it can refer to any specific pandemic.

For example:

  • The current pandemic is caused by COVID-19.
  • The 1918 pandemic was one of the deadliest in history.

The exception to this rule is for titles in which case “pandemic” is capitalized. In titles, you should capitalize everything except certain prepositions, conjunctions, and others. You can use our automatic title generator to figure out which words to capitalize.

For example:

  • I played the board game Pandemic last night over Zoom.
  • How the Pandemic Will End

What about “Epidemic?”

The word “epidemic” follows the same rules as “pandemic.” It should only be capitalized when used in a title.

What about “World Pandemic?”

The phrase “world pandemic” follows the same guidelines as “pandemic.” It should only be capitalized when used in a title.

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One of the most common causes for mistakes when it comes to capitalization is the idea that capitalization makes words look more official or important. While it’s true that capitalized words tend to be proper names, that isn’t really the intent behind it. And erroneous capitalization is as much of a mistake as forgetting to capitalize a word. Today’s topic is closely related to that idea, as we’ll try to answer is “anniversary” capitalized.

Is Anniversary Capitalized?

On its own, the answer is no. Anniversary does not have any special qualifications to be capitalized. Words are only capitalized in two main cases: when said word is the first in a sentence and when the word is a proper noun referring to a specific name or title. On its own anniversary is not a proper noun, it just refers to an idea. If the word anniversary is part of a larger title. For example, the 2014 film The Anniversary gets capitalized because it is a proper noun.

Most of the time, the word “anniversary” gets erroneously capitalized on its own due to the sense of importance we have added to it. Anniversaries are important dates and treated with a certain reverence, but that is not the proper purpose of capitalization. And people capitalizing it in regular writing or posters and the like are doing it due to a choice of style, not due to a correct grammatical rule, in short, it’s largely wrong.

There is however room for it to be capitalized in one specific context. And that is when we use it as part of a formal greeting or felicitation. In English, it’s commonly seen as correct to write Happy Birthday or Happy Anniversary when used as that exclamation, but that’s an exception to the rule, and the only context where anniversary gets to be capitalized on its own.

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Capitalization will always be one of those topics that while simple at first glance can lead to a lot of questions and doubts. It makes us scratch our heads every once in a while since the rules can be confusing.

So, Is Noon Capitalized?

In short, no. There’s no real need or excuse to capitalize noon. Unlike other questions related to capitalization, noon has no special exceptions and as such can be easily explained through the basic rules of capitalization.

By default words aren’t capitalized. They must only be capitalized if they are at the start of a sentence, or if they are a proper noun. In other words, if they are a proper name or title. “Noon” on its own just refers to a time of the day, not a specific person or company. As such it’s not considered a proper noun and has no need to be capitalized on its own. The only moments where it should be capitalized is in the case it starts a sentence or when the word noon is part of a bigger title or name. For example the classic western film High Noon. As the title of a movie, it becomes a proper noun and gets capitalized.

In fact, certain writing guides even insist on making sure that any writers formally use noon in lowercase. In this case, due to the use of noon as a measure of time has to the abbreviations a.m and p.m. Sources that use a.m. and p.m. in lowercase often insist that the same is done for moments of the day such as noon and midnight. Which makes it all the more unlikely that you’ll ever see noon capitalized.

You may be unsure whether you should capitalize “City Hall” or write it without capitalization as “city hall.” Well, depending on the situation you sometimes do want to capitalize city hall and other times you do not.

When Is City Hall Capitalized?

If you are talking about a specific City Hall in an exact place, you should capitalize it. For example, if you were telling a friend, “I went to the Saint Louis City Hall,” you would be talking about the City Hall within Saint Louis, a specific building in an exact physical place.

This is a situation where City Hall is a proper noun, as it is within that named city. This could also apply if you were talking about an exact city hall, even without naming a city. If you said, “I went to my City Hall in town,” you would be using a proper noun, as you are talking about a very real City Hall.

When Is City Hall Not Capitalized?

If you are not talking about a specific city hall, you should use lowercase letters. For example, someone writing a letter that encourages people to, “Call city hall and complain,” is not talking about a specific city hall, so they use the lowercase version.

Also, if you were saying a popular expression such as, “You can’t fight city hall,” that is a metaphor where city hall represents the government in general. It is not a real city hall, it is a fictional version and therefore is not capitalized–it is symbolic.

In Conclusion

When it is a specific City Hall in a real city and/or is an actual City Hall in a physical place, capitalize “city hall.”

When it is a generalized city hall used as a term for the government or is used as part of a popular saying where city hall is symbolic, do not use capital letters.

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Some questions invariably have an easier time being answered than others; it’s just a fact of life. And even when the topic is capitalization this remains true. Grammar can be complex, and English definitely is, so a lot of interesting and tough questions can arise easily. But today’s question is particularly tricky, so it’s better you pay close attention, as we try to answer…

Is Civil War Capitalized?

In most cases, the answer is a simple no, and that can be explained with the basic rules of capitalization. Words only need to be capitalized when they are at the start of the sentence, or when they are a proper noun, a word that refers to a proper title or name.

The word civil war on its own isn’t a proper noun, a civil war is just a kind of conflict, not any more specific than a football match or a movie screening. Civil war is never a proper noun on its own, so it should only be capitalized at the start of a sentence like in this one.

However there are many specific events and titles that use the words civil war, and in those cases, the entire title becomes a proper noun. If we talk about the famous movie Captain America Civil War we need to capitalize it, as the entire title is the proper name of the film. If the topic at hand is the American Civil War or the Spanish Civil War the situation repeats. This is because they are the proper names of a specific event and not just a civil war. A common usage of the word particularly in American articles is to shorten the American Civil War to just the Civil War, in this example the word is used explicitly as a synonym of the proper noun American Civil War, so it gets capitalized once again.

In short, civil war is not a word that is capitalized on its own, but as it’s very often used as part of proper titles it gets capitalized a lot. It’s just important to remember that this isn’t due to any special trait of the word civil war, but just due to the role it fulfills.

Diseases can be capitalized or not depending on certain situations. Primarily, diseases named after people should always be capitalized. Also, any disease that is the first word in a sentence or used in a title/headline should be capitalized.

Below is a list of diseases that should always be capitalized:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Lou Gehrig’s disease
  • Middle East respiratory syndrome (abbreviated as MERS)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Tourette syndrome
  • Huntington’s disease

The following diseases are not generally capitalized unless used in a title or as the first word in a sentence:

  • diabetes (including type 1 and type 2)
  • flu
  • influenza
  • cold
  • cancer
  • heart disease
  • coronavirus (except when abbreviated as COVID-19)
  • kidney disease
  • chronic lower respiratory disease
  • pneumonia
  • human immunodeficiency virus (except when abbreviated as HIV)
  • acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (except when abbreviated as AIDS)
  • hepatitis A/B/C
  • malaria
  • typhoid
  • tetanus
  • dengue
  • tuberculosis
  • celiac disease
  • severe acute respiratory syndrome (expect when abbreviated as SARS)
  • human papillomavirus infection (except when abbreviated as HPV)

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When it comes to doctors, titles, and designations, it’s easy to be confused about capitalization and grammar usage. Depending on the title of the person and the usage, the capitalization rules can differ.

Is Physical Therapist Capitalized?

The short answer is no, physical therapist is not capitalized, whether referencing the job position or a specific person.

While you would capitalize “doctor” in instances such as Dr. Brown or Doctor James, you wouldn’t capitalize “physical therapist Amy.” One exception to the rule, however, is the abbreviation. If you shorten physical therapist to PT, then that would be capitalized, as you would with all acronyms. To put it in perspective, let’s take a look at some examples to answer the question: is physical therapist capitalized?

Examples

  • My appointment with the physical therapist is on Monday.
  • She’s going to school the become a physical therapist.
  • One of the staff members, physical therapist Danny, has bright pink hair.

Here are some incorrect examples that show how physical therapist should not be capitalized:

  • She is my favorite Physical Therapist.
  • Danny has been a licensed Physical Therapist for 50 years now.
  • The Physical Therapist school has been open for quite some time now.

In each of these instances, “physical therapist” should be lowercase.

Titles and Exceptions

The other exception, as with all words, is in titles as in headlines. The general rule of thumb for titles is that words over four letters, in addition to words of importance, are capitalized. While different style guides have different rules, the words physical therapist would be capitalized in a title. Here are some additional examples.

  • The Physical Therapy Clinic of Boston
  • Danny’s Journey with Physical Therapy
  • The Physical Therapist of Today: A Comprehensive Guide for Beginners

In each of these examples, physical therapist would be capitalized, as would be physical therapy. Other specialized medicine fields follow the same rules, including neurosurgeon, oncologist, or even personal trainer.

The word “kindergarten” comes from the German word of the same spelling that literally means “children’s garden.” German nouns are generally capitalized so it can be confusing in English to know whether the word should also be capitalized.

Is Kindergarten Capitalized?

Generally, the word “kindergarten” is not capitalized because it is a common noun in the English language.

There are cases when “kindergarten” should be capitalized. The most common case is when it is the first word in a sentence. In that context, a word always has to be capitalized so “kindergarten” would definitely be capitalized.

The second circumstance comes when a word is part of a title or proper name. If we are talking about Kindergarten Stakes, the Australian club we have to capitalize the word “kindergarten,” as it’s part of the proper name for an organization. A similar case will happen in most schools. If we are talking about the name of a specific kindergarten, such as “Emily’s Kindergarten,” then we should capitalize the word.

The names of planets are capitalized since they are proper nouns referring to the planets in our Solar System or other solar systems. Therefore, you should capitalize the following planets and dwarf planets:

  • MErcury
  • Venus
  • Earth
  • Mars
  • Jupiter
  • Saturn
  • Uranus
  • Neptune
  • Pluto

What about the word planet?

The word “planet” is generally not capitalized since it is a common noun that refers to any planet. The only time you should capitalize “planet” is if it is used in a title such as the name of the seven-movement orchestral suite called “The Planets” by composer Gustav Holst.

Do you capitalize solar system?

Generally the phrase “solar system” is lowercase except when you are referring to the solar system that we live in. In that case, you should refer to our Solar System in capital letters.

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The word earth often confuses people when it comes to capitalization. Is it earth or Earth? When do you capitalize it?

When Is Earth Capitalized?

The confusion arises because Earth can be either a proper noun or a common noun depending on the context in which it is used. If Earth is used as a proper noun, then it is capitalized. If used as a common noun, then the word Earth is lowercased.

According to English capitalization rules, proper nouns are always capitalized. Therefore, when referring to the Earth as a planet or celestial body, it should be capitalized such as in the following sentence:

The Earth takes about 365 days to orbit the Sun.

In this case, both Earth and Sun are proper nouns so they must be capitalized.

When Is Earth Not Capitalized?

When Earth is not used as a proper noun, such as when you are referring to the ground, soil, or surface of the Earth, then the word is lowercase since it is a common noun. The following is an example of when Earth is referred to as a common noun:

The construction workers dug into the earth at the site of the new skyscraper.

It is important to remember that idioms using the word Earth also have to be lowercase such as in:  down to earth, what on earth, and four corners of the earth. These are cases where earth takes the definite article so it should not be capitalized.

What about Moon and Sun?

The same is true for other celestial bodies such as moon and sun. If you are referring to a specific sun or moon (i.e. they are proper nouns), then you should capitalize the word.

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For other capitalization questions, check out our FAQs or use our free title capitalization tool.

The word “sun” is not capitalized except when it is used in the astronomical context. Like every proper noun, the name of the sun is written in a capital letter. However, some confusion arises because our solar system sun is referred to as The Sun.

Therefore, the word to denote The Sun can either be a common or proper noun depending on the context.

When Is “Sun” Capitalized?

Take for example this sentence: “are all suns hot similar to The Sun?” The word “suns” in this sentence is a common noun, while “The Sun” (our sun’s name) is the proper noun which is why it starts with a capital letter. According to NASA’s style guidelines, when you refer to the sun at the center of our Solar System, you should capitalize it.

To capitalize or not to capitalize the word “sun” is not a question of grammar, but more of emphasis and usage. If you are advising people to watch an eclipse or warning them not to look at the sun eclipse directly, do not capitalize the word “sun.”

However, if it is a poetic metaphor whereby the Sun stands for something which is adding to the astronomical gadgets, for instance, something powerful which should be treated with extra care against something interesting yet not dangerous, the capitalizing sun is appropriate. But if you see it as the generic astronomical body, you don’t capitalize it. For example, “in an alien sky, we watched the blue sun rising above the horizon.”

Every time the word “sun” is applied apart from when referencing the star that our planet revolves around, capitalization follows the same rule as any other common noun. Don’t capitalize unless grammatical placement demands it. This may be in direct quotation first word, a new sentence first word, or a table cell or list entry. A common noun usage would be “we played in the sun the whole day.”

To sum up, there are not many fast and hard rules when it comes to the word “sun,” but generally, it is capitalized when applied like a proper noun, but it is not capitalized when used as a common noun.

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Government is a broad term, and depending on the way it is used in a sentence, it can be capitalized or not capitalized.

When Is Government Not Capitalized?

The government, when used as a common noun, should not be capitalized unless it comes at the beginning of the sentence. Here are instances when the word government is not capitalized:

  • The current government has failed to deliver its mandate.
  • The city government is in a financial crisis.
  • Most governments in Africa are headed by crooks.
  • The American government protects its citizens.

The term government in these examples is not capitalized because it does not refer to a specific government. This makes it a common noun.

Examples of questions where the term government is not capitalized:

  • Why is the current government reluctant to deport immigrants?
  • When did American governments formulate an effective plan for the benefits of their citizens?

When Is Government Capitalized?

When it is used as a proper noun

When referring to a particular entity or government, it qualifies to be capitalized regardless of where it is used in a sentence because it is considered a proper noun. For example:

  • The United States Government has deported all illegal immigrants.

Here it refers to the government of a specific country and, in this case, “The United States” so it is capitalized.

  • The Australian Government has agreed to partner with the United Kingdom Government to fight terrorism.

In this case, the term government is capitalized because it refers to specific countries, i.e., the United Kingdom, and Australia.

  • The South Africa Government is reluctant to renew foreigners’ work permits.

Headlines

The term “government” is capitalized when used in headlines such as newspapers and novels. Here are examples:

  • How the Government spent $150 million to prevent malaria outbreak.
  • The “Government Untold Tale” by Jason Stewart.

Questions

When used in questions, it can be capitalized. Here are examples:

  • Why did the United States Government disregard the 2018 supreme court ruling?
  • What led the US Government to cancel the scholarships recently awarded to needy students from across the globe.
  • Why is the US Government not planning to withdraw its troops from Iran shortly?

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We all want to start our letters, emails, and messages off on the right foot. First impressions matter a lot, and we want to make sure the one we give it’s the best we can. But this does lead to some interesting questions when the topics of email etiquette and proper grammar mix. That is in short the topic of today’s questions, as we try to answer the question:

Is Good Evening Capitalized?

If we look at the question from the usual capitalization rules then the question is a clear no. Capitalization rules indicate that you only need to capitalize a word if it’s the first one in a sentence, or if it acts as a proper noun.

That is to say that it is a proper name or title on it’s own. And “good evening” definitely doesn’t fit the second category, it’s just a greeting, and does not represent a person or company name on it’s own, so the only time it needs to be capitalized is when it’s the first word in a sentence. Or the rare cases when it’s part of a longer name or title, an example of this would be the movie Good Evening, as that is the proper title of a film in that context it’s a proper noun and get to be capitalized.

What About Email Greetings or Salutations?

It is rather common to see both words in “good evening” capitalized, particularly when it comes to emails or traditional letters. This comes from a form of etiquette inherent to writing letters, and is tied to how salutations are handled.

The opening greeting in a letter also known as a salutation is always delivered capitalized, and since good evening is so commonly used as that first greeting it is commonly delivered with both words capitalized.

However this rule only applies to letters, and it’s usage outside of them is not considered correct, meaning that most of the time good evening should not be capitalized.

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Who doesn’t like gaining an hour every fall? Unfortunately, you have to lose it again when spring comes around. But is daylight saving time capitalized?

Is Daylight Saving Time Capitalized?

According to the US Government Publishing Office style guide, the phrase “daylight saving time” should not be capitalized. They even say that the abbreviation “d.s.t.” should be lowercase.

However, it is a commonly accepted practice that the entire phrase, as well as the acronym, are capitalized such that they read “Daylight Saving Time” and “DST.”

Is It Daylight Saving or Savings Time?

The grammatically correct way to spell “daylight saving time” is without a “s” after “saving.” Some dictionaries say it is ok to say “savings,” but the generally accepted standard is to leave “saving” singular.

Occasionally people also try to may “daylight” plural or possessive, but it too should be singular.

Knowing whether to capitalize directional adjectives can be challenging. If you are referring to a group of proper nouns such as “the Southern States.” However, if instead you reference a general location, such as “the southern winds,” then the word southern should be lowercase.

What about south?

You should only capitalize directions, such as south, when you are referring to it as the proper noun, such as “in the South.” If you are merely referring to a direction, such as “go south on I-90,” then you should keep south lowercase.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

General capitalization rules of the English language state that proper nouns are always capitalized. Examples of proper nouns include names of people, organizations and major events. For instance, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is the formal name of the government agency and is hence capitalized. The same goes for historical events, such as the French Revolution or World War II. The names of movements are a bit trickier, however. For instance, Romantic, when referring to the 19th-century literary style is only capitalized when there is a possibility it could be confused with the adjective romantic, which means a person characterized by an idealistic view of reality.

So, Is the “Civil Rights Movement” Capitalized?

According to this rule, there would be no case where the phrase “civil rights movement” would be capitalized, as it has no synonym and refers to no single organization, but an array of movements brought together by a loose common cause.

What About Capitalizing “Civil Rights”?

Similarly, “civil rights” is an umbrella term for an expanding set of rights designed to protect individuals from governmental oppression. There’s no unified program that can be called civil rights, and the term has historically meant different things to different groups of people, so it is thus lowercase in a sentence.

Though different capitalization styles can be found even in academic publications, when in doubt, one should always consult a style guide they’ve chosen to write in. When it comes to “civil rights movement” and “civil rights”, three of the most widely used style guides, the MLA, the Associated Press Style Guide and the Chicago Manual of Style are all in agreement: these phrases are not to be capitalized. The Associated Press and the Chicago Manual of Style state no reason for this recommendation, whereas the MLA style guide states that the general trend in modern editorial style leans toward reducing capitalization to a minimum.

When Are “Civil Rights” and “Civil Rights Movement” Capitalized?

These phrases are capitalized when used in a title. According to standard title capitalization rules, only prepositions and conjunctions are usually lowercase.

 

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

While it is one of the basis of our language, or at the very least of our written language, capitalization can be somewhat hard to grasp at times. There’s a series of detailed rules that we were taught long time ago in our early formation days and most likely have forgotten by now. While it’s usually easy to tell when a word looks wrong without capitalization just from instinct alone, this has led to the complete opposite problem, the overuse of capitalization in a context that doesn’t require it, which is also a mistake on its own.

These somewhat forgotten rules have led me and others to ask, is industry capitalized? We have to answer…it depends.

Is Industry Capitalized?

Exceptions are kind of the norm when writing, so the most straightforward answer to the question is industry capitalized would be to simply say no, industry by itself is not usually capitalized. It is not a proper noun, so it should follow the usual rules of capitalization which say that you should only do so when it’s the first word in a sentence or when it is used in a title.

However some of you may have seen cases where the word is capitalized outside of the start of a sentence, and indeed there are a few circumstances where it’s allowed. Mainly this refers when it becomes a noun, or part of a title, if a company were to be named. For example in the company name Industry Incorporated, we’d have to capitalize industry, as it’s a noun in function. Another example is the Industry in California, as Industry is in fact it’s proper name it should be capitalized. But short of those specific exceptions the word industry should not be capitalized.

Titles are hard to come up with. Every writer or editor will tell you that. But what is also the trick is to figure out just how to capitalize one as well. There are four main styles of capitalizing a title. We won’t get too much into them here. But we can extract some basic guidelines from them and figure out the answer to the question:

Is “From” Capitalized in a Title?

The times when “from” is capitalized in a title

When we extract the common rules or tendencies from those four main styles of title capitalization, we know that the first word of a sentence is capitalized so “from” is capitalized if it is the first word of a sentence. The word “from” is capitalized in the middle of a title if you are using APA, AP, or MLA title capitalization styles in title case.

The following examples show the affirmative answer to the question, is “from” capitalized in a title:

  • “From a Brother to a Brother”
  • “The Answer to the Question, Where Does it All Come From?”
  • “From the Remains of Native Americans”
  • “From an Another Dimension”
  • “Places Where Joy Comes From”
  • “From Now on There Are New Rules in the World of Fitness.”

The times when “from” is written in lowercase in a title

If you are using sentence case or you are using the Chicago Manual of Style style guide, then you should lowercase the word “from.” 

Religious titles, like the pope, or a pastor, have their very own grammatical rules. And since the Catholic Church does a lot of things differently than the rest of the Christian world, one can’t help but ask, what is pope capitalized? Or should pope even be capitalized?

Is “Pope” Capitalized?

The times when the word “pope” is capitalized

As we all know, every word that comes at the beginning of a sentence should be capitalized so “pope” should be capitalized if it is the first word of a sentence. Additionally, if the word pope is being used to infer some sort of honor or high standing of a person, and it comes before the name of that person, it should also be capitalized. Pay special attention to the titles of people when you first mention them. It is a polite and wise thing to put their title or profession before their full name when you first mention them in your writing.

For example:

  • “Pope Benedict the XVI had a murky, some would even say sinister, youth.”
  • “Everyone loved Pope John Paul II, as he was a friend to many nations and a staunch enemy of communism.”
  • “Pope Alexander VI is considered by many to be one of not just the worst popes, but also a despicable human being.”

The times when the word “pope” is not capitalized

For every other case, pope should not be capitalized. No matter where the word stands, and no matter in what kind of a sentence, if it isn’t the first word in the sentence, or an honorific before a title, it has to be lowercased.

For example:

  • “Italy has given the biggest percentage of popes in history.”
  • “English royal houses have more often than not, clashed with popes.”
  • “Some people think that Alexander Pope was indeed a pope.”

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Understanding when certain words are capitalized can be tricky in the English language. Especially resume capitalization when certain job titles are capitalized while other words are phrases are not. That brings us to our FAQ today…

Is nurse practitioner capitalized?

Nurse practitioner is a term that can be used in lowercase form and uppercase form.

When referring to a specific individual who is a nurse practitioner, you should capitalize the first letter of each word. For example, “When you need assistance with anything, push the button and Nurse Practitioner Lee will be right in to assist you. The term will also be capitalized when abbreviated, such as, “If you have any further questions, please contact Debra Lee, N.P.”

The term nurse practitioner is used to describe an occupational type and is generally used as a common noun which refers to a generic title for a person, place, or thing. Therefore, it should not be used in the capitalized form in most circumstances. When speaking of the occupation, the term is presented in lowercase form. For example, “I met a nurse practitioner once; she was awesome at her job.” In this example, because the speaker did not mention the nurse’s name, there is no need to capitalize nurse practitioner.

Another way of thinking about whether you should capitalized the phrase is to consider the term nurse. It is not capitalized unless a name of a specific individual is mentioned after the term. The word “practitioner” after the term nurse identifies the type of nurse an individual is and provides the educational level in which a nurse has achieved. However, given that this is not a unique position, nurse practitioner would not be capitalized unless placed before a proper noun (a specific name of a place, person, or group, i.e. Biltmore Hospital).

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Whether writing a doctor’s name in an email or writing a job application, you need to know whether the work “doctor” is capitalized. Of course, the question of whether doctor should be capitalized has brought you to this page, but I want to answer that question in a more satisfying way such that you will never experience the same question again when writing.

Is Doctor Capitalized?

When you are deciding whether to capitalize the job title “doctor” or not, you should have the following capitalization rules and guidelines in mind:

  • Capitalize every job title that comes immediately before the name of the person you are describing. Job title before a person’s name replaces his or her first name.
  • Don’t capitalize job titles if it comes immediately after the person’s name, or is used instead of the person’s real names.

There are several exemptions to the above rule:

1. When the word doctor is used in a direct address. A good example is:

“Is she going to recover, Doctor?”

2. In the signature line at the end of a letter, the word doctor can be capitalized. A good example is:

Sincerely, Jeff Clinton, Doctor.

All job title abbreviations such as “Dr.” for the word doctor should be capitalized.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

There is a certain amount of controversy on the topic of is navy capitalized, and for once it’s a controversy that comes more from an area of politics than grammar, which might be sound odd at first, but stick with us and find out what makes this one word so unique in the English language and let’s try to find a proper answer to the question is navy capitalized.

So, Is Navy Capitalized?

Capitalization, in general, follows the same basic rules for all instances, which we all learned in school.

The first case is the simplest one: a word will always be capitalized if it’s the first word in a sentence, the most common example being the start of a paragraph. But any word after a period will be capitalized, as that means the start of a new sentence. You can see that example at play in this paragraph, so at any time that the word navy is the first in a sentence you’ll have to capitalize it, as its custom for all words.

Example: Navy ships came into the harbor.

The other case where a word has to be capitalized is when it acts as a proper noun. This means that a word is referring to a one-of-a-kind item or organization, which is the case of all proper names and the titles of movies, organizations, books and so on. In this context, we see that navy on its own is not a proper noun, it doesn’t refer to something unique and unrepeatable, a navy is a form of military organization that is available in many countries, so it’s as generic of a term as school or dog.

However the word itself is commonly part of larger titles or names, and in those cases as the title is the proper name of an specific entity or item, it has to be capitalized. the most classic example is the United States Navy, as this is the name of an specific navy it gets capitalized. Likewise, the 1990 film Navy Seals has to be capitalized as well, as that’s the title of a single film, making it a proper noun.

Now, this last instance leads to a unique rule, which has more of a basis in military policies than grammatical ones, but is nonetheless respected by various organizations. It is common in official documents particularly in the United States, according to military custom Navy (alongside sibling words such as Army, Air Force and so on) should be capitalized, but when it works as a synonym of the United States Navy, if following those rules then the word navy won’t be capitalized when talking about in general terms, but whenever it refers to the Navy conformed of American men and women in the frontlines, it gains the recognition to be capitalized.

The word army is both a common and proper noun. Determining when it should be capitalized largely depends upon the meaning intended and the context in which the word is being used.

According to Merriam Webster the word army can mean any one of the following:

  1. a large group of soldiers organized to fight battles on land
  2. the part of a country’s military force that includes soldiers who are trained to fight on land
  3. a large number of people or things involved in some sort of activity together

In the first case of the definition, a large group of soldiers organized to fight battles on land, army is not capitalized since it is not referring to a specific organization and therefore not a proper noun.

Here are some examples:

  • The two armies engaged in hand to hand combat against each other.
  • The army’s campsite was located on the outskirts of the city.
  • We wrote letters to the soldiers in the army thanking them for their service.

In the second case of the definition, when the army refers to the United State’s military, the word army is always capitalized because it refers to the proper name of an organization.

Here are some examples:

  • Under the constitution, the President is the commander and chief of the United States Army.
  • My cousin is currently serving in the United States Army.
  • He was undecided as to whether he wanted to join the Army or Navy.

In the last sentence, the word army is still capitalized even though the words United States are missing from the sentence. This is because in this example army directly refers to the United States Army.

However, when writing about the military of a foreign country, or using the term in a generic fashion, the word army is not capitalized.

Here are some examples:

  • The Russian army failed in their attempt to bring down the foreign government.
  • China’s army has continued to grow in strength and numbers.
  • The American army passed out blankets and supplies to the people of the war-torn nation.

In the third case of the definition, when army refers to a large group of people involved in the same activity, army is a common noun and therefore not capitalized.

Here are some examples:

  • I watched an army of ants crawl through a crack in the door.
  • An army of seagulls descended upon the beach searching for food.
  • When disaster struck, an army of volunteers flew to region to assist in the cleanup operations.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Capitalization is one of those writing aspects often taken for granted. English capitalization, in particular, is confusing since there are certain words that are always capitalized. “Nation” can be one of those words.

So, Is “Nation” Capitalized?

Nation should logically be capitalized if it’s the first word in a sentence. This paragraph already works as an example of it. Nation should also be capitalized in a title or when it is used as a proper noun such as saying “The Nation.”

In short, most of the time the word “nation” shouldn’t be capitalized. Nation is a common noun.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Another tricky word, that gives people or schoolchildren issues when they are writing something related to war is the word veteran. They often struggle with the question of: is veteran capitalized? In this article, we will provide an overview of when the word “veteran” is and isn’t capitalized.

When the word “veteran” is capitalized

Like any other word, “veteran” should be capitalized if it is the first word that starts a new sentence. It should also be capitalized when it is used as a name for a place or holiday.

There are also a few proper nouns that have the word veteran in them, like Veterans Day, which need to be capitalized as well.

Here are some examples of when “veteran” should be capitalized:

  • “He was born in a small town in New York, the town is called Veteran.”
  • “Veterans of the Vietnam War were treated more unfairly than any other war veteran population that we ever had.”
  • “One holiday that is celebrated with special awe and pride in our household is Veterans Day”
  • “Veterans can struggle to get back into society.”
  • “Veterans can suffer from all kinds of mental illnesses when they come back home.”

When the word “veteran” is not capitalized

In every other case, “veteran” should be written lowercased. That means that no matter what if the word isn’t at the beginning of the sentence or if it does not refer to a proper noun it has to be written with lowercase.

Here are some examples:

  • “A lot of veterans live in conditions that are not up to the average standard of living”
  • “We have a new neighbor who is a Gulf War veteran.”
  • “A country taking proper care of their veterans is a long tradition, even Romans and Athenians has pensions and holidays for their veterans”
  • “Both my father and grandfather were World War Two veterans”
  • “The man teaching our kid the guitar is a veteran.”

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Pastor is a religious title, and like the pope, the bishop, and similar religious titles, it has its very own rules. But the question still is worth asking, is pastor capitalized?

When Is the Word Pastor Capitalized?

As with any other word, if the word pastor is at the beginning of a sentence it has to be capitalized.

Likewise, if the word pastor is used as an honorific before the full name of the person, it should be capitalized. This is especially the case if this is the first mention of the person. Always put the word pastor before a person’s full name when you are mentioning him or her for the first time.

For example:

  • “Paige went to see Pastor Tim.”
  • “She has read what Pastor Tim wrote in his diary.”
  • “Pastor Tim and his wife Debra are expecting twins, a boy, and a girl.”
  • “The leader of our community, the much-beloved Pastor Eric Matthews, went missing in Africa earlier this week.”
  • “Pastor is a calling in life, not a job.”

 

When is the Word Pastor Not Capitalized?

In every other instance, the word pastor should be written in lowercase. This means that the word pastor should be written in lowercase if it finds itself in every place of a grammatical structure that is not the beginning of a sentence or before the name of the person who carries the word pastor as an honorific or religious title.

For example:

  • “Paige’s church is run by a very popular pastor named Tim.”
  • “Her pastor likes to keep a diary”
  • “I am so clumsy, I called our pastor bishop the other day.”
  • “She told me that your pastor does a lot of charity work.”
  • “The woman said that the FBI went and questioned our pastor for some reason.”
  • “Stan Beeman thought about being a pastor, but the quit life never really suited him.”

 

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Understanding capitalization rules for the English language can be challenging and the same is true for the word professor. Whether or not professor is capitalized depends on many factors, including where it is placed in the sentence and how it is used.

When you add other punctuation marks, such as commas, semicolons, and others, it can be hard to get the capitalization correct. With that in mind, here are the rules to correctly use this word.

You Should Capitalize Professor When:

  • The word “professor” is part of a title for a specific person or as a reference. The person’s name does not have to be included. Ex. Professor Emeritus John Doe or University Distinguished Professor or Alumni Distinguished Professor.
  • The word “professor” is at the beginning of a sentence. This rule goes for all words, as you learned many years ago.

You Should Not Capitalize Professor When:

  • When adding “professor” before a person’s name, unless it is the beginning of a sentence. ex. professor John Doe.
  • When “professor” is surrounded by commas. This same rule applies to other titles. Ex. We, the professor and I, went to class.
  • When there is no specific name attached to “professor.” Ex. The professor went to her lecture.
  • When a specific person’s title follows their name. Ex. John Doe, professor of Common Names.

Note: According to AP style, you should not abbreviate professor. Always write this word out fully.

Some people will want you to follow the AP style rules, but there are many other style guides. You will want to check which style guide is requested before completing your article.

With these rules in mind, you can wow your professor or colleagues. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to send us a message. We’re happy to help you master grammar and produce better content every day.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Europe is one of the most diverse regions in the world where rich and ancient linguistic heritage is widely documented. As such, it is expected that any terminology relating to the region itself, its people or speech should adhere to strict grammatical rules.

So, is European Capitalized?

The simplest answer is yes since European, even when used as an adjective, is referencing a proper noun. However, before any explanation is provided, it is wise to explore which parts of speech the term pertains to as it will facilitate understanding.

1. It is a proper noun

Nouns are names of places, people and things, we all know that. The term “European” can be used as a noun and a proper noun for that matter. For example, if we say: “The European has just arrived,’ The word ‘European’ represents a nationality. Rules of grammar place nationality under proper nouns. The term can just as well be replaced with a real name such as Donald, James or Sarah. This, therefore, is one of the reasons why the word “European” should be capitalized.

2. It can also function as a proper adjective

Any word that modifies a noun is known as an adjective. They come before a noun and are used to give more information about the noun. The term “European” not only plays the role of a noun but can also be an adjective. For instance: “The European Currency is quite stable.” The noun, in this case, is the word Currency. However, once we add European to the sentence, then the currency is awarded an identity, a European one to be precise. Thus, the word European modifies the currency as a proper adjective. As per the rules of capitalization, proper adjectives should also be capitalized.
Examples:
  • Noun: Every European should take summer vacation if they can.
  • Adjective: Frankfurt is a European Airport.

Conclusion

Generally, no matter what part of speech the term “European” represents, it should always be capitalized. I will leave you with the following two examples of how the word can be used as both a proper noun and proper adjective.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

There’s a lot of confusion surrounding “AM” and “PM.” Are AM and PM capitalized? Do you write them with periods or without? Regardless of where or what you’re writing, the consensus is to capitalize AM and PM. AM and PM stands for ante meridiem and post meridiem, which are Latin phrases meaning before midday, and after midday. When it comes to abbreviations and acronyms, these letters should be capitalized. Just like you’d write BBC, NBC, or your ABCs, AM and PM should be capitalized.

Are AM and PM Capitalized In Sentences?

Like these other acronyms, that also means you should leave out any punctuation or periods. Here are some examples of sentences with AM and PM.

  • I woke up at 5 AM to go for a run.
  • Let’s agree to meet for lunch at 3 PM.
  • Did you say the movie starts at 10? Is that AM or PM?

Here are some common mistakes and incorrect examples.

  • Is the game at 9 pm?
  • He wakes up every day at 10 A.M.
  • She called me last night at 6 p.m.

Notice that some of these examples are commonly used, and may not stand out as being wrong. People often lowercase AM and PM in casual or informal writing, so it doesn’t really matter how you stylize them. However, for formal publications, essays, and books, AM and PM should be capitalized.

Are AM and PM Capitalized In Titles?

These rules also apply to titles. In titles, words over four letters, in addition to words that are important, are capitalized. Although AM and PM are two letters in length, they should be capitalized in a title.

Here are some examples:

  • 5 AM at the Airport: A Novel
  • We Met at 3PM That Day
  • I’ll See You in the AM

There you have it. Is AM and PM capitalized? The answer is yes, no matter which way you cut it.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Understanding when certain words are capitalized can be tricky in the English language. Especially resume capitalization when certain job titles are capitalized while other words are phrases are not. That brings us to our FAQ today…

Is registered nurse capitalized?

Registered nurse is a term that can be used in lowercase form and uppercase form.

When referring to a specific individual who is a registered nurse, you should capitalize the first letter of each word. For example, “When you need assistance with anything, push the button and Registered Nurse Lee will be right in to assist you. The term will also be capitalized when abbreviated, such as, “If you have any further questions, please contact Debra Lee, R.N.”

The term registered nurse is used to describe an occupational type and is generally used as a common noun which refers to a generic title for a person, place, or thing. Therefore, it should not be used in the capitalized form in most circumstances. When speaking of the occupation, the term is presented in lowercase form. For example, “I met a registered nurse once; she was awesome at her job.” In this example, because the speaker did not mention the nurse’s name, there is no need to capitalize registered nurse.

Another way of thinking about whether you should capitalized the phrase is to consider the term nurse. It is not capitalized unless a name of a specific individual is mentioned after the term. The word “registered” before the term nurse identifies the type of nurse an individual is and provides the educational level in which a nurse has achieved. However, given that this is not a unique position, registered nurse would not be capitalized unless placed before a proper noun (a specific name of a place, person, or group, i.e. Biltmore Hospital).

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

When it comes to chemical names in grammar, a common question is are chemical names capitalized? While chemistry can be confusing and contain many complex rules, the guidelines for capitalization are pretty straightforward.

Are chemical names capitalized?

In general, when dealing with chemical compounds and elements in grammar, there are a few things to remember. Chemical elements, like hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium, are not capitalized when used in a sentence. They should be treated the same as proper nouns.

Their chemical symbols, however, like H for hydrogen, N for nitrogen, and He for helium, are indeed capitalized.

This changes when chemical elements are used in a title. In a title, treat each chemical element like a common noun. In all writing styles, the first letter of each common noun is capitalized in a title. Take, for example, this title: “Properties of Hydrogen.” In the title, hydrogen should be capitalized.

What about chemical compounds?

The rules apply for chemical compounds, which are two or more chemical elements combined. For example, the chemical elements that makeup water are two molecules of water and one molecule of oxygen. The chemical compound is written out as dihydrogen monoxide.

In a sentence, dihydrogen monoxide would typically be written in its chemical symbols of H2O, but if it were to be written out in its elements, it would be lowercased dihydrogen monoxide. In a title, however, the words would follow the same rules as common nouns and be capitalized.

While this might seem complicated, it’s actually straightforward. Just remember, chemical elements and chemical compounds when used in a sentence should not be capitalized. When using the chemical symbols, which are the single or pairs of letters that replace the elements, the first letter should always be capitalized.

Finally, when using chemical elements and compounds in a title, the first letters should be capitalized.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Standards of writing dictate what constitutes proper and legible writing. Where these standards diverge, it may be somewhat confusing to properly spell out some expressions in our text, which brings us to the word under discussion: Democracy, a noun characterizing a style of governance allowing people to choose the legislation governing them.

Is democracy capitalized?

The short answer is sometimes. But when exactly is democracy capitalized?

The first, and the most obvious, instance where one should capitalize the word democracy is where it occurs at the beginning of a sentence (or just after a full stop). In some instances, democracy is capitalized after a colon if the statement after the colon consists of more than one sentence. In reported speech, democracy is capitalized if the words being quoted form a full sentence. For example:

“Democracy is a prominent style of leadership in the world.”

“Abraham Lincoln said, “Democracy is government of the people, by the people, for the people.”

The next, instance where democracy is capitalized is when it appears in a title. A general rule of thumb regarding titles states that the first and last words of the title, verbs, adverbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, and subordinate conjunctions are capitalized when writing a title. A good example would be the title of this article. The noun (democracy), verb (capitalized) and first word (is) are all capitalized. Were we to reorganize the title, following the principle expressed above, the title would resemble the following:

“Democracy is Capitalized?”

or

“Capitalized Democracy is” (if the title were being written by Master Yoda)

The least obvious case where the word democracy is capitalized is when it is used as a proper noun, meaning a name for some person or entity, the same way you would capitalize John or Toyota. While it may be rare that you will write about a person named Democracy, you may find yourself making direct reference to the name of a style of governance. This may look something like this:

“This leadership style is called Democracy…”

Above, since you make direct reference to a name, Democracy becomes a proper noun, meriting its capitalization. Beyond these instances, is democracy capitalized? As mentioned before, democracy is a noun. Common nouns referring to general, non-specific things are normally not capitalized in writing. Be it that we speak generally of any political ideology, aristocracy, monarchy, etc, we would not capitalize the words in writing.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Capitalization rules can be tricky since depending on the type of word (noun, verb, adjective, preposition) determines whether it is capitalized when following certain style guides. In the instance of some words like “our,” which could be considered to be a very important word or not, depending on who you ask, what is the rule there?

So, Do You Capitalize “Our” in a Title?

The University of Purdue’s Online Writing Lab (AKA the Purdue OWL) provides some context on the subject of capitalization of titles, “the major words in the titles of books, articles, and songs (but not short prepositions or the articles the, a, or an if they are not the first word of the title).

For those of you who have been out of school for too long and forgot what a preposition is, a preposition is word that is used “to show a relationship in space or time or logical relationship between two or more people, places or things” (Cambridge Dictionary) There are in fact over 100 prepositions in the English language. Some notable prepositions include: about, above, by, for, in, out, until, and with among numerous others.

The word “our” is not a preposition neither is it an article, meaning that under the understood laws of capitalization and titles in the English language, you should, in fact, capitalize the word our in a title.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

In most situations, Roman numerals are capitalized. This is primarily due to the origin of the numerals. When Roman numerals originated during the Roman empire, all writing was capitalized – there was only one form for each letter and number rather than an uppercase and lowercase iteration. In fact, the word “capital” came to be used for the letters because they were used at the top of Roman columns, which was called the capital.

Can Roman Numerals be Lowercase?

While people now use English letters to represent the Roman numerals, the original numerals were simply the form only, and there was not a lowercase version until they began to be represented in English.

Because English letters now are used to represent the Roman numerals, it is not uncommon to find them written in lowercase, especially when used in outlines and lists. This can help to delineate the level in an outline; the first level is standard Roman numerals (I, II, III), followed by one or more of the following: capital English letters (A, B, C), English numerals (1, 2, 3), lowercase Roman numeral representation (i, ii, iii), or lowercase English letters (a, b, c). Whatever pattern is chosen is repeated if further layers are needed.

Along with the numerals themselves, other terms used with Roman numerals are generally capitalized. An example of this is when used in titles such as Chapter IV or Section II.

One other situation in which one may find lowercase Roman numerals is as page numbering when the pages occur before the official first page of a book, usually a textbook.

Regardless of whether the Roman numerals are capital or not, the value remains the same. XIV and xiv both represent 14. However, to be correct in most situations, the capital form should be used. Unless it is certain that the lowercase form is appropriate, it is best to use capital letters for Roman numerals.

Is the Term “Roman Numerals” Capitalized?

While Roman numerals themselves are generally capitalized, the term “Roman numerals” also has some special capitalization rules. The word “Roman” should always be capitalized since nationalities are always capitalized. “Numerals” on the other hand does not need to be capitalized in a sentence unless it is used in a title and follows title capitalization rules.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Press releases are often a big deal, and their importance might have you asking “Is press release capitalized?”

The short answer is no, but when it comes to capitalization, there are always a few exceptions to the rule. Taking a look at a few example sentences will help you fix your sentence before you send that important email or letter.

Capitalizing “Press Release” In a Sentence

When talking casually about a press release or mentioning it in a sentence, the words “press release” are not capitalized. For example,

There is a press release scheduled for noon.

The restaurant held a press release on Thursday.

Our year-end press release is on New Year’s Eve.

In all of these examples, “press release” is not capitalized. It is not a proper noun, such as a name or a place, so like all nouns, it is left uncapitalized.

Exceptions to the Rule

Of course, there are a few exceptions to the rule. The first one, of course, is to always capitalize the words “press release” in a title. While capitalization in titles is different depending on MLA, APA, or other styles, the general rule of thumb is to capitalize all important words and words five letters or longer. Press release fits both of those categories, so it is capitalized in a title. For example,

The Thrive Solutions Press Release

2019 Old Town Book Store Press Release

However, if you were to mention a specific press release in passing, it would not be capitalized. For example,

Are you going to the Thrive Solutions press release?

What day is the Old Town book store press release?

In general, you shouldn’t worry about capitalizing “press release” unless you are writing a title or a formal email, discussing a specific event. While English may seem like a tangled web of rules, it’s best to remember to use lowercase when discussing press releases.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

With the 2020 presidential election coming up, you may find yourself wanting to tweet about it or to post something about it on Facebook, Snapchat, or Instagram. To keep from being the recipient of criticism over an incorrect use of capitalization you need to know how to properly capitalize the term election day.

Is Election Day Capitalized?

You might skim through the pages of the GPO Style Manual, which is the guide to style for federal government publishing, and discover that the term election day should be lowercase instead of capitalizing it like so many other holidays and occasions that it lists in the manual. If you were to stop there and take this source as the final authority on how to type or write the term, then you would not discover that there are at least two other reputable sources that declare the opposite.

However, the Chicago Manual of Style suggests that the term election day should be capitalized to Election Day. Since it is a reputable and widely used guide for style, you may want to follow its guidance more so than the guidance of the government.

When deciding whether or not you will capitalize election day in your social media posts, consider that the media itself has taken a stance on this issue. The Associated Press is a professional body of American journalists and recommends that election day should be capitalized to Election Day. Interestingly, however, the same is not true for election night, which they say should be left lowercase.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Both the names of Walt Disney World and Walt Disneyland should be capitalized. This is because they are proper nouns. Proper nouns, which are specific names of people, places, or things, should always be capitalized when used in a sentence. This sets them apart from common nouns, which are the more general way to speak of a thing. For example, the common nouns for these locations would be “amusement park,” “entertainment complex,” or “resort.”

Walt Disney World Resort is located near Orlando, Florida. Disneyland Park (its proper name) has a location in Anaheim, California, and an additional location in Paris, France. These amusement parks were created by The Walt Disney Company which was founded by Walt Disney. They are often abbreviated in writing and in speech to the more common “Disney World” and “Disneyland.” In fact, many people simply refer to either one as “Disney” as in, “We are going to Disney for vacation.” Listeners infer which park is being referred to based on the general location of the speaker, which is usually based on which coast of the United States is nearer at the time of the statement. Regardless, the name should always be capitalized.

Is Disneyland One or Two Words?

Note that Disneyland is not separated into two words; the name of the park is combined into one word. The “land” part of the word is not separately capitalized in this instance (DisneyLand), although some brands that combine words do choose to capitalize even in the middle of the word (such as DreamWorks and YouTube). This is because the founders of Disneyland Park chose to treat it as a single word rather than using bi-capitalization (also known as intercaps or camel case). Disney does use this occasionally, such as in its shopDisney online store, even though its regular storefront is called Disney store (without the extra capitalization).

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Email addresses are composed of two parts: the username and the domain. The username is to the left of the @ symbol and the domain name (which the username is created on) is to the right side. For example:

username@dom.ain

Both domains and usernames can include letters, numbers, and symbols, but what about capital and lowercase letters?

Are email addresses case sensitive?

Domain names are case insensitive so GMAIL.com, gMAIL.com, and gmail.com all go to the same place. Therefore, the domain side of the email address is case insensitive. 

However, the username side of email addresses can contain uppercase and lowercase letters. The difference with usernames is that most email clients interpret uppercase and lowercase letters differently so most of the time [email protected] is different than [email protected]

This does depend on the email client and how they process email address usernames. For example, Gmail processes email addresses with periods and mixed in the middle the same way. Therefore [email protected]om is the same as [email protected] Both are the same as [email protected]

Examples:

Other Email Articles:

Are you having doubts about whether the word Caucasian should or should not be capitalized? It can happen often that we’re writing a word and suddenly wonder if it should be capitalized, we will give you the rules for capitalization to make you a master at it.

Is Caucasian Capitalized?

The word Caucasian was originally used to depict the people that came from the Caucasus, a region in Russia in which most people are predominantly white. Then it was used to depict anyone who had European origins until it transformed into the definition we have nowadays, where Caucasian depicts mainly white people.

The rules of the English language say that we should always capitalize nouns and adjectives referring to language, race, nationality, and tribe. For example:

  • Caucasian
  • Spanish
  • American
  • Amerindian
  • Francophone
  • Inuk
  • Argentinian
  • Canadian
  • Japanese

Like we said before, the word Caucasian refers to a specific group of people, whether it’s white people or European descendants, Caucasian is used to describe a race so it must be capitalized.

Every time a noun or adjective refers to a country, to a specific tribe or race or it’s talking about someone’s language it should be capitalized. Keep this in mind next time you wonder whether a word should be capitalized or not.

Here are some examples of phrases that contain the word Caucasian:

My uncle’s best friend is called Edward, and he comes from a Caucasian country

Latin America is very diverse since it’s composed by Indigenous people, African descendants, Caucasians and the combination of those three groups, which are called Mestizos.”

I grew up having a Caucasian mother and an African American father, so I learned to recognize better how and why the African American community was sometimes stigmatized.

According to the evidence of mummies, the Egyptians were slender build, with dark hair and of Caucasian type.

Is White Capitalized?

The word “white” is currently lowercase according to all major style guides when referring to both the color and the ethnic group Caucasian. There is a lot of debate about whether the word “white” should be capitalized, especially in light of Black Lives Matters movements.

Related Articles:

The Midwest is an expansive region in the US and often referred to in writing and in conversation. Locations and places often confuse people when it comes to capitalization. If you find yourself wondering “is Midwest capitalized?” then check the examples below.

As a Proper Noun

In English, proper nouns and locations are generally capitalized. For example:

Anna went to Chicago last week.

Diana flew home to the Midwest for the holidays.

In these instances, Chicago and the Midwest are physical locations and defined regions. That makes them a proper noun, and capitalized in a sentence. Notice, however, that we generally don’t capitalize “the” in the phrase “the Midwest.”

As an Adjective

Midwest, like many locations or countries, can be converted to an adjective. For example, you might hear phrases such as “the midwestern accent” or “midwestern states.” When it comes to the directions– meaning North, South, East, and West– their adjectives are always lowercase. For example:

The tourists said they were midwestern.

I think that my favorite food is southern comfort food.

The book shop is in the northern part of the city.

This isn’t to be confused with nationalities, which are always capitalized. For example,

An American man walked into the store.

The German restaurant was quite popular.

The Italian team won the final match in the Olympics.

Because midwestern is a direction and not a country, we wouldn’t capitalize it when we say “midwestern people.”

As a Direction

If it ever gets a little confusing, it’s important to remember that Midwest is more of a direction than a location. Locations (such as America, Spain) have a slightly different set of rules. But like all the directions, Midwest is generally capitalized. For example:

The book store is coming to the Midwest and the Southeast.

I think she lives in the Southwest now.

In the South, the weather tends to be warmer.

North, South, East, West, and all their counterparts are capitalized. Add “-ern,” and that becomes the opposite, however.

Of course, because Midwest and midwestern are over five letters, they get capitalized regardless if used in a title. If you’re stuck on whether or not to capitalize Midwest in your particular sentence, using uppercase is a safe bet. However, just remember that just because Midwest is capitalized in your sentence, words later on such as midwestern aren’t.

Related Articles:

Whether you should capitalize seasons is a tricky question in the English language.

Generally, in English, the word “spring” is not capitalized. Seasons are considered as common nouns and as a general rule of capitalization, seasons are not capitalized when used in writing. This rule applies to all seasons, including spring.

However, the rules are different when referring to breaks from school.

Is Spring Break Capitalized?

The rule that “spring” is lowercase is general but there are some exceptions in which you should capitalize seasons and capitalize “spring.”

Phrases such as “Spring Break” and “Spring Semester” should be capitalized when referring to specific events such as “Spring Break 2020” or “Spring Semester 2020” but lowercase otherwise.

Apart from these exceptions, the word spring should always start with lowercase. The most common mistake that people make when writing the names of the seasons is getting confused about the capitalization but these rules will help you write it correctly.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The Olympics happen every two years, alternating between summer and winter. They are great world events that showcase the greatest athletes on the planet.  However, when reporting on them, do you capitalize the word Olympics? What about when “winter” or “summer?”

Is the word “Olympics” capitalized?

The word “Olympics” is always capitalized because the word refers to the series of events that are a proper noun.

For example, you would say “The next Olympics are in Tokyo this summer.”

You also should capitalize the words “Winter,” “Summer,” and “Games” when combined with the word “Olympic” or “Olympic.” For example, you would capitalize “Winter Olympics” and “Olympic Games.”

Did you know?

The word “Olympics” comes from the Greek word Olumpikos meaning ‘of Olympus or Olympia,’ both proper nouns. Because these words are proper nouns describing a place where the Olympics originated, any reference to the place should be capitalized as well. This is also true for the Olympic Mountains and Olympia in Washington State.

 

It’s that time of year again. The regular football season is over and it’s Super Bowl time. Watching the game with friends is a great way to spend a Sunday afternoon, but is the phrase Super Bowl capitalized?

Is Super Bowl capitalized?

Yes, the phrase Super Bowl is capitalized when referring to the sporting event marking the end of the football season. Just like other named sporting events, like the Olympics, Super Bowl is capitalized because it is a proper noun.

What about Super Bowl Sunday?

When Super Bowl is used as an adjective to describe a word(s) following it, then the following words are also capitalized. Therefore, you’d capitalize Sunday after Super Bowl so it would be “Super Bowl Sunday.” Btw, you also capitalize days of the week, so that applies here, too.

Another example is “It’s Super Bowl Game Day.” In this case, “Game Day” is capitalized because “Super Bowl” is describing what kind of “game day.” As an fyi, the phrase “game day” is always two separate words unless used in a title or other name where the author has intentionally made the choice to combine it.

According to the AP Stylebook, you should reference the Super Bowl by the year played, not the Roman numeral, so you’d write “2019 Super Bowl” or “Super Bowl 2019.” Other style guides allow you to use Roman numerals after the word Super Bowl so you could write “Super Bowl LIV.” In this case, the Roman numerals are capitalized.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Germany is among the prominent European nations whose rich linguistic heritage is widely documented. As such, it is expected that any terminology relating to the nation itself, its people or speech should adhere to strict grammatical rules.

So, is German Capitalized?

The simplest answer is yes since German, even when used as an adjective, is referencing a proper noun. However, before any explanation is provided, it is wise to explore which parts of speech the term pertains to as it will facilitate understanding.

1. It is a proper noun

Nouns are names of places, people and things, we all know that. The term “German” can be used as a noun and a proper noun for that matter. For example, if we say: “The German has just arrived,’ The word ‘German’ represents nationality. Rules of grammar place nationality under proper nouns. The term can just as well be replaced with a real name such as Donald, James or Sarah. This, therefore, forms one of the bases to why the word “German” should be capitalized.

2. It can also function as a proper adjective

Any word that modifies a noun is known as an adjective. They come before a noun and are used to give more information about the noun. The term “German” not only plays the role of a noun but can also be an adjective. For instance: “The German Economy is quite stable.” The noun, in this case, is the word Currency. However, once we add German to the sentence, then the currency is awarded an identity, an German one to be precise. Thus, the word German modifies the currency as a proper adjective. As per the rules of capitalization, proper adjectives should also be capitalized.
Examples:
  • Noun: Every eligible German should register as a voter.
  • Adjective: Frankfurt am Main Airport is an German Airport.

Conclusion

Generally, no matter what part of speech the term “German” represents, it should always be capitalized.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

When it comes to the English language, there’s quite a few rules on capitalization, and navigating them can be tricky. Certain words seem to fall into the grey area of uppercase or lowercase, but fortunately, it’s easier than you think. If you’re scratching your head and wondering “is capitalism capitalized?” then consult this easy guide.

The short answer is yes, capitalism is capitalizedwith only a few minor exceptions.

Rules of Capitalization

First, let’s consult the basic rules of capitalization for the English language. When it comes to these kinds of words, you should capitalize:

  • All Proper Nouns (ie names of people, countries, places)
  • Languages and Nationalities (ie French people, the Russian Language)
  • Holidays (ie Christmas, New Year’s)
  • Religions (ie Judaism, Buddhism)
  • Events (ie Coachella, The Met Gala)
  • Brands, Businesses, and Corporations (ie Dove soap, Nintendo, Johnson & Johnson
  • Planets (ie Mercury, Mars)

What might be more helpful, however, is to look at a list of words not capitalized in English:

  • Concepts and Political Ideologies (ie optimism, capitalism)
  • Animals (ie parrot, cat)
  • Seasons (ie spring, summer)
  • Food (ie spaghetti, steak)
  • Space objects besides planets (ie moon, sun, stars)

Should capitalism be capitalized?

Of course, there are more instances and exceptions to add to the list. If your head is spinning, there’s no need to fret. The first thing to look at is what kind of word is capitalism? Capitalism is a noun and represents a political concept or ideology. Capitalism, in most instances, is not the name of a party or group of people, so it cannot be a proper noun. Therefore, capitalism is lowercased. Let’s take a look at the word in a sentence.

Some people find fault with the concept of capitalism.

Anna is studying the history of capitalism in her class.

The United States was built on a system of capitalism and the American dream.

The same goes for the adjective form of capitalism, which is capitalist:

The capitalist countries met in a summit to discuss trade deals.

For some people, it is difficult to survive in a capitalist economy.

Exceptions to the Rule

Capitalism, or any form of it, should always be lowercased in your sentence. However, there are some universal exceptions to that rule. Namely, if the word comes at the beginning of the sentence, or is being used in a title, then it should be capitalized like all words. The word capitalism is over five letters, which means it will be upper case in any title. Here are some examples of where we would in fact capitalize the word:

Capitalism is a concept dating back several hundred years.

The United States’ Complicated Relationship with Capitalism (title)

So there you have it. When in doubt, use lowercase. It’s also helpful to know that other political ideologies are lowercase as well, as long as they’re not referencing any kind of party or movement (ie communism vs. the Communist Party). Approaching the capitalization rules in English can be daunting for some, but if you follow the handy chart and can categorize your word, it’s easier than you think.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

It can be confusing when you want to capitalize a word and you don’t know if you should do it. But, there are simple rules to follow if you want to know whether a word should be capitalized or not.

This happens also when we talk about languages, days of the week, months, countries, and yes, even holidays are capitalized in English!

Is Thanksgiving Capitalized?

To help you visualize this answer you should always remember that holidays, both secular and religious are capitalized. It doesn’t matter if they’re not at the beginning of a sentence.

This happens because they’re proper names that describe a specific day and you should capitalize the first letter. These holidays are unique days and thus the importance of capitalizing them.

So days like Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Christmas and Thanksgiving will always be capitalized. Here are some examples to help illustrate:

  • “Our neighbors don’t like it when their son Jacob doesn’t spend Thanksgiving Day with them.”
  • “My dog loves the smell of the Thanksgiving turkey.”
  • “We will visit your family for the next Thanksgiving Day.

Take a look at the words that are capitalized. They are either at the beginning of a sentence or they are a proper noun. Note that the word “Day” is also capitalized because it’s part of the phrase, if the word “day” is alone it shouldn’t be capitalized. This happens with other holidays like Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or Independence Day.

To Summarize

It’s normal to have doubts about grammar, but is more important to clear them out! Remember that all holidays are proper nouns and all proper nouns have to be capitalized in English. Every language has different rules about capitalization so don’t apply these rules to any other language and vice-versa.

So we hoped we have solved your doubts and now you can enjoy Thanksgiving with your family!

Other Holiday Capitalization FAQs:

Capitalization is one area of English grammar that seems simple, but can quickly become incredibly complex. In this article, we will look at the proper capitalization procedures to follow when using the word ‘party’ in close connection with political ideologies.

Is Party Capitalized?

The word ‘party’ falls into a number of different categories depending on its usage. As a noun it refers to social gatherings or a group that has gathered for a specific task. For example, you could describe a ‘cocktail party’ or a ‘search party’. In this form, the word ‘party’ is subject to the capitalization rules of any normal noun.

‘Party’ can also be used as a verb to refer to the act of enjoying oneself without restraint, or the act of throwing a party. For example, you could say, “We partied last night,” or, “We are partying.” Again, in this form, the word ‘party’ is subject to the regular rules of capitalization that govern verbs in the English language.

The third form that the word ‘party’ can take is an adjective or descriptive word to indicate an item, person, or persons that are defined by their relation to a party. For example, the word ‘dress’ is further described by adding the word ‘party’ in front of it, making it a ‘party dress.’ By specifying the type of dress, the reader or listener knows more about the garment and its usage. Again, the word ‘party’ follows the regular rules for capitalization that are enforced upon adjectives.

Where the capitalization rules for the word ‘party’ diverge from basic grammatical practice is when it is used in conjunction with a political group. The reason for this differentiation is to help distinguish political terms from the ordinary usage of the same word. For example, the word ‘party’ in the phrase ‘we are going to a conservative party’ is not capitalized, but the word ‘party’ in the phrase ‘a member of the Conservative Party‘ is capitalized, which helps differentiate between a calm, night in with friends and an individual who is part of a political party.

The rules for capitalization for the usage of the word ‘party’ in conjunction with political groups or movements is very straightforward. When the word ‘party’ is preceded by the official name of a political party it must be capitalized, as in the term ‘Conservative Party’ or ‘Communist Party.’ The only exception to this is if it is used as a generic term, as in the phrase, ‘a new socialist party was founded’.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

When writing a title, should you capitalize the word “my” in the title?

This question is debated by many writers and scholars of the English language as many feel that all words of less than five characters should not be capitalized. The flip side of that argumynt is that the two-character word “my” should be capitalized because it is a pronoun and considered a major part of speech.

Others will argue further that typically, “my” is used as a adjective or determiner so it may not necessarily be capitalized.

Luckily, there are style manuals that set the rules for writing. This includes writing text along with writing titles.

Is My Capitalized in a Title?

The three most commonly consulted style books are the Associated Press Stylebook, the Chicago Manual of Style, and the Modern Language Association Handbook. Though lesser-used, the New York Times Manual of Style and Usage, the Wikipedia Manual of Style and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association are also used by writers and scholars alike.

While two of the most commonly used manuals, the Chicago Manual of Style and the Modern Language Association state that you should lowercase articles (a, an, the), coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions. “My” is not one of those so it should be capitalized in a title.

When writing titles such as “In My Country,” the two-letter word “my” is capitalized because it is a possessive pronoun.

So, the short answer to the question of whether or not to capitalize “my” in a title is, yes, you should capitalize it in titles.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

When writing a title, should you capitalize the word “me” in the title?

This question is debated by many writers and scholars of the English language as many feel that all words of less than five characters should not be capitalized. The flip side of that argument is that the two-character word “me” should be capitalized because it is a pronoun and considered a major part of speech.

Others will argue further that typically, “me” is used as the subject, and the subject should definitely be capitalized. Otherwise, it might downplay the significance of the subject and the premise of the story or article altogether.

Luckily, there are style manuals that set the rules for writing. This includes writing text along with writing titles.

Is Me Capitalized in a Title?

The three most commonly consulted style books are the Associated Press Stylebook, the Chicago Manual of Style, and the Modern Language Association Handbook. Though lesser-used, the New York Times Manual of Style and Usage, the Wikipedia Manual of Style and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association are also used by writers and scholars alike.

While two of the most commonly used manuals, the Chicago Manual of Style and the Modern Language Association follow the rule that all words of less than five letters should not be capitalized, they both consider all pronouns, regardless of letter count, important enough to be capitalized.

When writing titles such as “Take Me to the River,” the two-letter word “me” is capitalized because it is a pronoun. In the same title, the two-letter word “to” is not because it is a less significant preposition and is of less than five characters long. Similarly, the word “the” is not capitalized because it is also a less significant article and also has less than five characters.

So, the short answer to the question of whether or not to capitalize “me” in a title is, yes, you should capitalize it in titles.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Writing titles to publications, essays, articles and more can be fun but also confusing. Which words are capitalized and which words aren’t. “You” is one word that people most often are puzzled about.

Is You Capitalized?

Does one need to capitalize the word “you” when using it in a title? The answer is not black or white. In some writing style guides, the answer is yes, while in others, the answer is no.

There are three style manuals most often used in the United States: The Associated Press Stylebook, The Chicago Manual of Style and the Modern Language Association Style Book. The rules for capitalization, while similar, do not always agree between these three styles.

If you have the word “you” in a title, you must first determine which style guide is most appropriate for your article or story.

All three styles require that the first and last word of a title be capitalized. So, if “you” is either the first or last word of the title, it is always capitalized.

Here is where it gets tricky. All three style guides require that pronouns, such as “you,” be capitalized. However, the Associated Press and the Modern Language Association both rule that all words of less than five letters not be capitalized.

So, if you are using “you” in a title that follows either the Associated Press or Modern Language Association styles and it is not the first or the last word, then you do not capitalize it.

The exception is if you are following the Chicago Style Manual which requires you to capitalize “you” because it is a pronoun and that particular guide does not take into account the size of words for capitalization purposes.

However, some scholars will argue that the pronoun rule outweighs the letter count rule for any style, and they will argue in favor of capitalizing the word.

Your safest bet, in this case, is to move “you” to either the first or last word of the title, and then you will know that you will always be correct.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

The capitalization of words, especially in titles, is very specific to the style of writing of the person, publication or institution controlling the pen. It may come as no surprise therefore that consensus on strict rules governing writing styles may vary. So when writing, should the word “will” be capitalized and if so, when do we capitalize “will”?

Is Will Capitalized?

The first and most obvious instance where one should capitalize “will” is where it occurs at the beginning of a sentence (or just after a full stop). Regardless of the context, will is capitalized whenever it is used to begin a sentence. Upon closer examination, it is more than likely that this sentence will form a question rather than a statement describing intent or conviction.

In titles, a good principle to remember is that all nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, pronouns and subordinating conjunctions are capitalized. “Will” is a modal verb, meriting its capitalization when you include it in a title. A good example to draw from looks as follows:

TITLE: “There Will Be Blood.”

Above, the word “will” is capitalized along with all words falling into the classification described above. It is necessary to state that if “will” is being used as a proper noun, that is, a name for some person or entity you are writing about, then it should be capitalized regardless of where it occurs in the sentence.

Overall, the key principle in discerning when to capitalize “will” is consistency. Should you decide to stylistically omit capitalization of all words shorter than five letters, it is recommendable to do this consistently throughout your writing such that even if a reader diverges with your take on writing styles, they note it as your exercise of preference rather than a blunder in writing.

“Capital” is one of those words that may periodically need some looking over in terms of its capitalization, especially since it is so close to the word “capitol”. For reference, the word “capital” can refer either to an important city or town within a country or to a form of wealth owned by someone. There’s also capital letters, which is what we’ll talk about in the next paragraph in reference to when to use them when using the word “capital.” It can get a bit confusing, right? “Capitol,” on the other hand, refers to the a capitol building commonly located within a capital city. An easy way to remember the difference between these two words is that capitol has an “o” in it, which is the same shape as many circular capitol buildings.

Is Capital Capitalized?

Now, let’s talk about when to capitalize the word “capital.” The only time you need to worry about capitalizing the word “capital” is when you’re referring to a city or town, not when you’re referring to a type of wealth or capital letters.

More specifically, only capitalize the word “capital” when you are referring to an individual city or town, not the idea of a city or town. This is because when you’re referring to an individual city or town, you’re referring to a proper noun.

It’s the same reason you capitalize the names of people or countries, like the name Frances or the country France. For example, if you wanted to say, “Montgomery is the Capital of Alabama,” you would capitalize the word capital. Remember, use an “a” when talking about a capital city.

If you’re talking about the capitol building, you would say “The Capitol Building of Alabama is located in Montgomery.” However, if you want to talk about capitals more generally, you don’t need to use capitalization. For example, if you wanted to say, “The United States has many capital cities,” you would not capitalize the word capital.

See if you can identify why we have or have not capitalized the word “capital” in the following sentences:

  • Capital cities are major decision-making centers in the United States.
  • Major decisions about laws in the United States are made in capital cities.
  • There are 50 capital cities in the United States.
  • There are 50 capitals in the United States.
  • There is a federal capital.
  • There are state capitals.

 

  • There is a federal capitol building.
  • There is a federal capitol.
  • There are state capitol buildings.
  • There is a state capitol.

 

  • Montgomery is Alabama’s State Capital.
  • The State Capital of Alabama is Montgomery.
  • In school, children are sometimes required to learn all of the state capitals.

 

  • North Carolina’s State Capital is Raleigh.
  • The North Carolina State Capital is Raleigh.
  • North Carolina’s State Capitol building is located in Raleigh.
  • North Carolina’s State Capitol is located in Raleigh.

Conclusion

Let’s review. “Capital” is different from “capitol.” The only time you capitalize “capital” is when you are referring to an individual capital city.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Whether you are just learning the rules of English grammar or you have been reading huge books and publishing works for years, it never hurts to brush up on the rules and ask questions as you go along. There’s always more to learn about how to communicate more effectively with the help of correct grammar usage.

Is Capitol Capitalized?

The word “capitol” is one of those words that often needs some reviewing and clearing up. For one thing, it can be difficult to keep straight the difference between the definitions of “capitol” and “capital.” For reference, “capitol” refers to a specific building in which laws are made whereas “capital” refers to the city in which a capitol building is located. To remember the difference between these two definitions, you can remember that a “capitol” which has an “o” in in it which looks like a circle and is the shape of many capitol buildings. “Capital,” on the other hand, has an “a” instead of an “o.”

But notice how we haven’t capitalized either of these words yet.

The point at which you capitalize the word “capitol” is when you begin to use it as a proper noun, which refers to an individual place, person, or organization. The same way you would capitalize a specific name or place, e.a., the name “Robert” or the continent “Africa,” you capitalize the word “capitol” when you are referring to the name of an individual capitol building.

See if you can identify why the word “capitol” is capitalized or not capitalized in each of the examples that follow.

  • The U.S. Capitol Building is located in Washington, D.C.
  • There are many beautiful capitol buildings in the U.S.
  • Not all capitol buildings look the same.
  • Understanding when to capitalize the word “capitol” can be confusing at first.
  • There are national capitol buildings.
  • There are state capitol buildings.
  • There are even capitol buildings in other countries.
  • The state capitol is located in Lansing.
  • The state capital is Lansing.
  • Hawai’i’s State Capitol is located in Honolulu.
  • The Hawai’i Capitol is located in Honolulu.
  • Hawai’i’s State Capitol building is located in Honolulu.
  • The Hawai’i Capitol building is located in Honolulu.
  • I have been to the Michigan State Capitol.
  • Children learn about state capitols in school.

In summary, “capitol” is different than “capital” just by one letter. You can remember the different meanings by remembering that the “o” in “capitol” is the same shape as many of the capitol buildings to which the word refers to. Capitalize the word “capitol” when you use it to refer to an individual building. However, when you are just talking about the concept or idea of a capitol building, there is no need to capitalize it.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Other FAQs:

Is Senate Capitalized?
Are Government Department Names and Positions Capitalized?
Capital vs Capitol
Is Government Capitalized?
Is White House Capitalized?

Have you noticed that some people capitalize the word impeachment and some people do not. Do you want to know what you should do when writing about someone facing impeachment? Only under special circumstances would you ever capitalize the “impeachment.” In fact, I bet you already know when the word should be capitalized.

One of the reasons people get confused about whether this word should be capitalized is because of how the word is written in the Constitution. You will note that the word impeachment appearing in the middle of a passage has been capitalized. This would suggest that the proper way to write the word would be to capitalize it. The Constitution states:

“The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors”

This follows a similar style of writing that the 45th president has adopted in his official Twitter statements. While capitalizing words that you wish to be noted in your text can be effective it is not common practice. When writing most people follow a set of writing principles that we all were taught when learning the language.

Is Impeachment or Impeached Capitalized?

So when do we capitalize words? We capitalize words at the beginning of a sentence or if we are using a proper nouns. So if we are using the term “impeached” or “impeachment” at the beginning of a sentence then, of course, you would capitalize the word; however, you would not capitalize the word “impeachment” or “impeached” in the middle of a sentence because these words are not considered proper nouns. Note: proper nouns refer to specific names of people and places.

The term “impeach” can be both a verb and a noun as noted in the Merriam-Webster dictionary. “Impeached” is an example of a verb and verbs are not capitalized. For example, you would write “Johnson was the first president to be impeached” not “Johnson was the first president to be Impeached.” The same is true for “President Trump is the third president to be impeached.”

So you would never capitalize the verb impeached unless a sentence began with the word or the word is part of a title. For example, the word impeachment should be capitalized when referring to the book “To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment” by Tribe and Matz. Here the word impeachment becomes part of a proper noun: the name of a book.

Conclusion

Only proper nouns should be capitalized unless they begin at the beginning of a sentence. Even words that you specifically find important do not need to be capitalized. So when you are writing about impeachment or someone being impeached it is not necessary to capitalize the word unless it appears at the beginning of a sentence or in a specific title.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

In English, the general rule of thumb is the first letter of proper nouns are capitalized, and common nouns are lowercase. Common nouns refer to a non-specific person, place, thing, or idea. While proper nouns refer to a specific person, place, thing, or idea.

This can get complicated when dealing with a word like “communism” that can be both proper and common depending on its usage. Here are some common examples of how this word is used and whether or not to capitalize.

Is Communism Capitalized?

There are several ways that the word “communism” can be used.

A political party along with the word “party” are capitalized when talking about a specific political organization’s proper name. This holds true for the word “communism.”

For instance,

  • “She is a member of the Republican Party.”
  • “She is a member of the Communist Party.”

Communism is also capitalized when it is referring to the members of that political party.

For example,

  • “A Communist gave a lecture today.”
  • “There are many Communist Party members here today.”

Communism is lowercase when it describes common nouns or adjectives. When communism is talked about as a political ideology, it is being referred to as a common noun.

See the difference in this example,

  • “The Communist gave a lecture about communism today.”

The member of the political party is capitalized, while the ideology (the common noun) is lowercase.

Here is another example,

  • “We were taught communism in school when the Communist Party was in charge.”

The common noun is lowercase, while and the political party is capitalized.

Capitalizing the first word in a sentence is proper English grammar. The word “communism” is capitalized regardless if it is used as a proper or common noun when it is the first word in a sentence.

For example,

  • “Communist Party members will protest tomorrow.”

And,

  • “Communism is a common noun.”

Communism is capitalized when it’s part of a proper noun like in the name of a specific book, movie, magazine, or newspaper.

For instance,

  • “He gets ‘Communism Monthly’ delivered to his house.”

When referring to as a specific time “communism” is also capitalized. When referred to as a general time it is lowercase.

For example,

  • “They lived in East Germany during the Fall of Communism in 1989.”

Versus,

“They lived in East Germany during the days of communism.”

Finally, the word “communism” is capitalized when it is used to refer to a specific place.

As seen here,

  • “We walked through Communist Square during lunch.”

Because this is a specific place it is a proper noun so communist is capitalized.

Conclusion

Hopefully these examples are helpful. English capitalization rules can be tricky so hopefully this clarifies some of the rules.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Spain is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. As such, it is expected that any terminology relating to the nation itself, its people or speech should adhere to strict grammatical rules.

So, is Spanish Capitalized?

The simplest answer is yes since Spanish, even when used as an adjective, is referencing a proper noun. However, before any explanation is provided, it is wise to explore which parts of speech the term pertains to as it will facilitate understanding.

1. It is a proper noun

Nouns are names of places, people and things, we all know that. The term “Spanish” can be used as a noun and a proper noun for that matter. For example, if we say: “The Spanish man has just arrived,’ The word “Spanish” represents nationality. Rules of grammar place nationality under proper nouns. The term can just as well be replaced with a real name such as Donald, James or Sarah. This, therefore, forms one of the bases as to why the word “Spanish” should be capitalized.
Additionally, when referring to the language, “Spanish” should be capitalized since it again represents nationality (the language that the Spanish people speak).

2. It can also function as a proper adjective

Any word that modifies a noun is known as an adjective. They come before a noun and are used to give more information about the noun. The term “Spanish” not only plays the role of a noun but can also be an adjective. For instance: “The Spanish Economy is a bit unstable.” The noun, in this case, is the word “Economy.” However, once we add Spanish to the sentence, then the Economy is awarded an identity, a Spanish one to be precise. Thus, the word Spanish modifies the currency as a proper adjective. As per the rules of capitalization, proper adjectives should also be capitalized.

Conclusion

Generally, no matter what part of speech the term “Spanish” represents, it should always be capitalized. I will leave you with the following two examples of how the word can be used as both a proper noun and proper adjective.
Examples:
  • Noun: The Spanish make great food.
  • Adj: Barcelona is a Spanish city.

The word “country,” depending on the context in which it is used, could refer to a defined geographical region of the world or to a genre of music. In writing though, it may baffle some to figure out how to properly capitalize the word. So the question comes, when should you capitalize the word “country” in writing?

Is country capitalized at all?

The answer, again, depends on the contextual use of the word in your writing.

The first, and most obvious instance of capitalizing the word “country” would be when the word comes at the beginning of a sentence (or just after a full-stop).

Since we capitalize all opening words of a sentence, the word country would find no exception if it occurred in a sentence as follows (for example):

“Country music reminds me of Texas…”

Next, you should capitalize “country” if it occurred in the title of some writing.

The title of this article is a fine example to draw from. The core principle is that in a title, the first and last words, pronouns, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs and all subordinate conjunctions should be capitalized. “Country,” as a noun, would therefore qualify for capitalization in a title.

Another instance where you should capitalize the word “country” is when it is used as a proper noun.

Proper nouns range from your name to the names of days, places and even cars! Suppose there was some entity you were writing about. Should you choose to name this entity Country, you would have to capitalize that name every time it occurs. It would probably look as follows:

“We went to the old house with Cowboy and Country…”

Colons mark another potential opportunity to capitalize the word in question. Country is capitalized if it comes right after a colon. This is to be treated separately from the case with fullstops because it comes with a condition, namely, that the statement after the colon should contain more than one sentence. Consider the following extracts (the first requiring capitalisation and the second one not):

  • “The soldiers had it engraved in their hearts what came first: Country and the desire for sovereignty. For these they would live and in pursuit of these they would die…
  • “The soldiers had it engraved in their hearts what came first: country and the desire for sovereignty.”

Above, the first statement has multiple sentences after the colon. This merits the capitalization of the word that comes directly after the colon.

Finally, you would capitalize “country” if it came at the beginning of a quotation (given the quotation is a full sentence).

Of course, in any other context, “country” would not be capitalized and would be treated as any other noun. So is country capitalized? As you can see, it depends on where it is used.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Yes, Mother’s Day is capitalized when referring to the holiday.

Reason #1: While Mother’s Day is not an official federal holiday, it is considered to be one of the most common celebrations, like Groundhog Day and April Fools’ Day. That’s why it is always capitalized.

Alternatively, the following words like mother, mother, and mom are broadly termed as ‘family names.’ They are generally used as a common noun. However, whenever you are using these family names in the form of proper nouns, they need to be capitalized. For your reference, the examples are given below:

I) My mother is not well.

– Here the word ‘mother’ has been used as a common noun and it isn’t capitalized.

II) I have planned to celebrate Mother’s Day In May.

– Here the word ‘mother’ has been used as a proper noun. Thus, it is capitalized.

 

Reason #2: Mother’s Day is widely celebrated to honor mothers as individuals. This is the day when the children portray their sincere respect and gratitude towards their mothers. This day is special and unique to every mother. Considering its significance and importance, the term Mother’s Day is capitalized.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

A county, like a city, is a geographical region in a state or country. There are two rules to determine whether or not you should capitalize the word “county” when you are writing. If you are writing the name of a county, the name and the word “county” should both begin with a capital letter. If you are writing about a generic county, the word “county” should NOT begin with a capital letter.

Is County Capitalized?

The word “county” can be capitalized depending on when and how it is used. When used generically to describe a county which could be any county, then the word “county” is lowercase. This also includes when the word “county” is used before a named place. If you are referring to a generic county and it isn’t given a specific name, the word “county” does not need to be capitalized.

For example, “I don’t know what county he lives in.”

However, when used as part of a proper noun, the word “county” is capitalized along with the rest of the proper name. In a sentence with a named county, the word “county” should be capitalized.

For example, “He lives in Smith County.”

The sentence could refer to any county, and so it does not need to be capitalized. The same is true of all generic places, like “a road,” or “that city.” Those phrases use what is called a determiner.

Kinds of determiners:

  • Articles—a, an, the
  • Quantifiers—some, many, few
  • Interrogatives—which, what

If the sentence indicates a number, the word “county” is not capitalized.

For example, “He moved to a second county.”

If a sentence indicates a specific but the word “county” is separated from the name, then it also doesn’t need to be capitalized.

For example, “He lives in Smith, which is a county a few miles away.”

Even though that sentence makes it clear what county the author is referring to, “county” is not next to the name, so it doesn’t need to be capitalized.

You can find other examples of when the word “county” is capitalized and not capitalized below.

Examples of When “County” Is Capitalized

  • King County streets are mostly one-way.
  • Fairfax County Courthouse
  • The County gave out several citizens’ awards.
  • I live in George County.
  • He moved from Smith County to George County.

Examples of When “County” Is Not Capitalized

  • You can’t fight the county government.
  • The county government is too bureaucratic.
  • What county did you move to?
  • I like the county you live in.
  • Smith is such a nice county.
  • He lives in Smith City, in the county with the same name.

Regardless, when writing a title for a book, article, or any publication, nouns should always be capitalized, so that even if it doesn’t have a name, “county” should be capitalized. If the title of a book is “The County I Lived In,” all of the words should begin with a capital even if the word “county” is generic.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Other Common Capitalization Questions

Christmas is a holiday celebrated on December 25th of every year. It is a proper noun since it refers to a holiday. Since all proper nouns are capitalized, Christmas is also capitalized.

What about Christmas Day?

Since the word “day” is part of the proper noun “Christmas Day,” when used together both words are capitalized. The same is true for the greeting “Merry Christmas” and “Christmas Eve.”

Correct: Merry Christmas
Incorrect: merry Christmas
Incorrect: Christmas eve

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

The conversation about whether the word “Native American” is capitalized has created quite a controversy in recent years. There are mixed opinions about the proper way to capitalize the phrase and what certain capitalization ways refer to.

Is Native American Capitalized?

Fundamentally, if you are referring to the indigenous population of people who lived in the territory that is now the United States of America prior to European settlers, then you should capitalize both words in the phrase Native American.

The other main way that people capitalize this phrase is “native American,” which came into use in the 1700s. When the first word “native” is lowercased, it generally refers to someone who was born in the territory that is now the United States of America. Since it is a common noun, in this case, referring to anyone born in this territory, it is lowercase. American is capitalized since it refers to a nationality.

 

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Capitalization rules are tough to remember in general and sometimes it can be challenging to remember rules for specific types of words.

Generic Animal Names

Generally, animal names are lowercased unless used in a title with title case. For example, “fox” and “panda” are generally going to be lowercase in a sentence. However, there are specific times when certain animal names may be capitalized.

Dog Breeds

Most dog breeds are lowercased unless they contain a proper noun, such as “German shepherd” in which case the proper noun (German in this example) is capitalized, but the common noun is lower case. Other examples include French bulldog or Scottish terrier.

Dog breeds where all words are lower case include cocker spaniel, golden retriever, and chihuahua.

Binomial nomenclature

In the scientific world, the scientific names of animals are capitalized using binomial nomenclature, which is a system that uses Latin words to classify living organisms. The structure uses two words to construct the classification: the Genus name and the species name.

The first letter of the Genus name is always capitalized and the species name is always lowercase. Also, the full name is always italicized.

Some examples of binomial nomenclature animal names are:

  • Homo sapiens (Human Beings)
  • Panthera tigris (Tiger)
  • Canis lupus familiaris (House Dog)

Pet Names

Pet names are considered proper nouns so they are generally capitalized. For example, “Garfield” would be capitalized since it is a pet name. However, when saying “Garfield the cat,” the word “cat” is lowercase since it is not part of the name. A confusing exception to this rule is of course “Felix the Cat” whose full name includes the word “cat” meaning it is capitalized in this case.

In general, capitalize just the name of the animal and nothing else.

 

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

 

Capitalization rules can be hard to understand and remembering the rules for certain words can also be challenging.

Is the word lawyer capitalized?

Normally, the word “lawyer” is not capitalized in a sentence unless it is being used in a title, is part of a proper noun, or is the first word in a sentence.

However, it is capitalized when used as part of a name or precedes a name since it becomes a proper noun. An example of this is”Please excuse Lawyer Smith” because in this case, it becomes part of the proper noun.

The same goes for any related words to a lawyer such as “Esquire,” “Justice,” “Attorney,” “Judge,” etc.

More examples include:

  • Lawyer Rudy Giuliani was asked to speak.
  • Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh would like to comment.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Generally, job titles are capitalized if you are referring to a specific job title at a company such as “Chief Marketing Officer” or the job title precedes the name of a person.

For example, you would refer to “Chief Marketing Officer Bob” with capital letters since the job title is a specific title and it precedes the name of a person.

A few more examples include:

  • Senior Vice President Stephanie
  • Chief Executive Officer George

General Job Titles

Generic job titles that occur more than once at a company are generally lowercase, especially when not preceding a name. For example, “digital marketing manager” and “senior managers” are not capitalized.

The following examples illustrate this:

  • Bill called all of the senior managers into a staff meeting.
  • The digital marketing manager role on that team is open.
  • All of the senior vice president’s direct reports are being transferred to the acquiring company.

Acronyms

Acronyms are always capitalized so the following job title acronyms would always be capitalized:

  • CEO
  • CFO
  • CMO
  • CTO
  • CIO
  • CRO
  • EVP
  • SVP
  • VP

For more help with title capitalization questions, try out our free capitalization tool.

Do you capitalize family member names like grandma, mom, dad, cousin, etc.? The words can be capitalized depending on how they are used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence they should be lowercase such as in the following sentence: “my grandparents said to visit them,” then the word grandpa is lowercase because it is a generic noun. The same goes for cousin: “my cousin came to visit.”

Correct: My grandparents are the best.
Correct: My cousins are the best.
Correct: My cousin came to visit me.
Correct: My mom is the best.

However, if you are addressing your family members directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Grandparents?
Correct: Want to go to the movies, Cousin?
Correct: Can I go to the movies, Mom?

The same holds true for any other family member names.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Is college capitalized? It’s not a simple yes or no, unfortunately. There are instances when one is required to capitalize the word “college” while in others, a lowercase is required. Without further ado, let’s get to the distinctions.

When is college capitalized?

When it is a proper noun since proper nouns are always capitalized

Proper nouns differ from other types of nouns in that, they offer specificity to a person, a place or a thing. If we, for instance, say, “The boy is coming,” it could just be any boy, However, if we state that “Peter is coming,” then we have specified which boy is coming hence the name Peter is capitalized. The same applies to the term “college.”

When used as a proper noun such as “Harvard College” or “College of Charleston,” then the college is capitalized. It has a physical presence and can be seen, visited and addressed. As such, it is a proper noun, which requires capitalization according to the conventions of grammar.

Even when used alone, the term “College should still be capitalized if it still sustains specificity. For example: “I wish to attend Harvard College. The College offers a specialized programs whose standards are universally accepted.”

Note that the term ‘College’ has been used twice in the sentence above. In the first instance, it appears within a proper noun. However, in the second, it is used alone. Since we already are aware which college is being talked about, then the word is still capitalized as It pertains to a specific institution.

Another example would be: “UCLA was closed down. Wildfire was the cause of the College’s closure.”

When is College not capitalized?

When it is a common noun

If you are talking about a college in general, then it becomes a common noun and is hence not subject to capitalization. Common nouns are generic names that offer no specificity. If we. say: “Going to college is an ideal dream to many people.” Then “College” becomes generic. Nobody knows which exact college we are talking about. Grammatically, any common noun should be written in a lower-case-format.

Conclusion

When it comes to the term “College,” the key aspects to consider are proper or common. If it appears as a common noun, then do not capitalize. However, if it demonstrates the properties of a proper noun such as identity and specificity, then, by all means, do capitalize.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Related Articles

During the holidays, the use of new year vs New Year gets confusing for most people and this should never be the case. It is important for everybody to have the right knowledge of the proper capitalization of both holiday terms and holidays in order to avoid embarrassment when sending out holiday greetings.

Is New Year Capitalized?

The short answer is that New Year (and Happy New Year) are capitalized.

This a very common question especially for teachers just before schools break for the holidays. It is also a conundrum for anyone who sends out holiday cards.

Why New Year is Capitalized

The distinction between new year and New Year depends on whether the reference is being made on the year or the holiday itself. If a reference is being made on the holiday, then it should be capitalized e.g. Happy New Year!

However, when someone is making reference to the year itself then it should not be capitalized e.g. It is the second day of the new year.

It is grammatical and customary to capitalize both secular and religious holidays. In addition, when the words eve and day constitute the holiday name then they should be also capitalized. This is regardless of whether the name of the holiday is shortened or not e.g. New Year’s Eve.

One easy way to remember is never to capitalize in instances when you are using an article such as the or a.

So, is new year capitalized? It depends on how it is being used.

Happy New Year or Happy New Year’s?

It can be confusing around the New Year whether you which someone a “Happy New Year” or “Happy New Year’s.” When do you use the apostrophe-S vs not? Generally, these two phrases can be interchanged, but one makes more sense on December 31st than the other.

You only really use “Happy New Year’s” on December 31st or January 1st because you are wishing someone a happy “New Year’s Day” on that day in particular. Most people drop the “day” as the last part of that phrase which is where the confusion comes in. Again, if you say one or the other no one will correct you (unless your grammar teacher cousin is at the party).

Conclusion

Hopefully, we have cleared up any confusion that might exist when sending out holiday cards to your friends and family. Spread the word on when New Year is capitalized and help everyone to ring in the new year correctly.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

It depends on which style you are using.

When using the Chicago Manual of Style and AP style, the word “with” should always be lowercase in a title unless it is the first or last word in a sentence. This is because “with” is a preposition which according to title capitalization rules are always lowercase in titles.

However, in APA and MLA styles, the word “with” is capitalized because all words longer than four words are capitalized.

To find out what other words are always lowercase in a title, try out our free title capitalization tool.

Do you capitalize the word “grandparents?” The word can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my grandparents said to visit them,” then the word grandpa is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: My grandparents are the best.

However, if you are addressing your grandparents directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word grandparents.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Grandparents?

The same holds true for any other names you might call your grandparents such as grandma or grandpa.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “grandma” or “grandmother” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my grandma said to visit him,” then the word grandma is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: My grandma is the best.
Correct: My grandmother loves me.

However, if you are addressing your grandma directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word grandma.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Grandma?
Correct: Can I go to the movies, Grandmother?

The same holds true for any other names you might call your grandmother such as “papa” or “papap.”

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “grandpa” or “grandfather” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my grandpa said to visit him,” then the word grandpa is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: My grandpa is the best.
Correct: My grandfather loves me.

However, if you are addressing your grandpa directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word grandpa.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Grandpa?
Correct: Can I go to the movies, Grandfather?

The same holds true for any other names you might call your grandfather such as “papa” or “papap.”

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “mom” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my mom said to visit her,” then the word mom is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: My mom is the best.

However, if you are addressing your mom directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word mom.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Mom?

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Knowing whether seasons, such as spring, are capitalized can be challenging since we frequently see seasons both capitalized and not depending on where you look.

In proper English, the word “spring” is not capitalized. Seasons are considered as common nouns and as a general rule of capitalization, seasons are not capitalized when used in writing. This rule applies to all seasons, including spring.

Can spring be capitalized?

The rule that “spring” is lowercase is general but there are some exceptions in which you should capitalize seasons and capitalize “spring.” The only time you will see the word spring capitalized is when it is used in a title or as the first word of a sentence. Another exception is when the season is personified in poetry or it is a name of an event or a person, such as in “Spring Semester.”

Apart from these three exceptions, the word spring should always start with lowercase. The most common mistake that people make when writing the names of the seasons is getting confused about the capitalization but these rules will help you write it correctly.

What about words after “spring”?

Phrases such as “Spring Break” and “Spring Semester” should be capitalized when referring to specific events such as “Spring Break 2020” or “Spring Semester 2020” but lowercase otherwise.

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

All government department names and titles of positions are capitalized because they are considered proper nouns. See below for an extensive list of various titles and departments which are capitalized.

United States Government

Executive Departments

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • U.S. Department of Commerce
  • U.S. Department of Defense
  • U.S. Department of Education
  • U.S. Department of Energy
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security
  • U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • U.S. Department of Justice
  • U.S. Department of Labor
  • U.S. Department of State
  • U.S. Department of the Interior
  • U.S. Department of the Treasury
  • U.S. Department of Transportation
  • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Executive Offices of the President

  • Office of the President
  • Office of the Vice President
  • Council of Economic Advisers
  • Council on Environmental Quality
  • National Security Council
  • Office of Management and Budget
  • Office of National Drug Control Policy
  • Office of Science and Technology Policy

Judicial Branch

  • Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts
  • Bankruptcy Courts
  • Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces
  • Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit
  • Court of Federal Claims
  • Court of International Trade
  • Federal Court Interpreters
  • Federal Judicial Center
  • Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation
  • Supreme Court of the United States
  • Tax Court
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims
  • U.S. Courts of Appeal
  • U.S. Sentencing Commission

Legislative Branch

  • Senate
  • House of Representatives

The President’s Cabinet

  • Secretary of State
  • Secretary of the Treasury
  • Secretary of Defense
  • Attorney General
  • Acting Secretary of the Interior
  • Secretary of Agriculture
  • Secretary of Commerce
  • Secretary of Labor
  • Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
  • Secretary of Transportation
  • Secretary of Energy
  • Secretary of Education
  • Veteran’s Affairs Secretary
  • Secretary of Homeland Security

Others:

  • White House Chief of Staff
  • Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency
  • Director of the Office of Management & Budget
  • United States Trade Representative
  • United States Ambassador to the United Nations
  • Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers
  • Administrator of the Small Business Administration
  • Electoral College
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  • Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
  • National Security Agency (NSA)

There are many other sub-agencies that should be capitalized as well.

 

United Kingdom Government

Departments

  • Attorney General’s Office (AGO)
  • Cabinet Office (CO)
  • Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS)
  • Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS)
  • Department for Education (DfE)
  • Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
  • Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU)
  • Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Department for International Trade (DIT)
  • Department for Transport (DfT)
  • Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)
  • Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC)
  • Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO)
  • HM Treasury (HMT)
  • Home Office (HO)
  • Ministry of Defence (MOD)
  • Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG)
  • Ministry of Justice (MoJ)
  • Northern Ireland Office (NIO)
  • Office of the Advocate General for Scotland
  • Office of the Leader of the House of Commons
  • Office of the Leader of the House of Lords
  • Scotland Office
  • Wales Office
  • Export Credits Guarantee Department (ECGD)
  • Office for Veterans’ Affairs

Titles

  • Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service
  • Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
  • Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State
  • Home Secretary
  • Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
  • Secretary of State for Defence
  • Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
  • Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
  • Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
  • Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government
  • Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
  • Secretary of State for Education
  • Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
  • Secretary of State for Transport
  • Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
  • Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
  • Secretary of State for Scotland
  • Secretary of State for Wales
  • Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
  • Secretary of State for International Development
  • Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
  • Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
  • Also attend Cabinet meetings
  • Chief Secretary to the Treasury
  • Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
  • Attorney General
  • Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (jointly with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government)
  • Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
  • Also attend Cabinet meetings
  • Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)

The word Vice President often confuses people when it comes to capitalization. Is it vice president or Vice President? When do you capitalize it?

The word “vice president” is a proper noun or a common noun depending on the context in which it is used, so the capitalization rules vary.

If Vice President is used to refer to a specific person with a title, then it is capitalized such as:

  • Vice President Mike Pence
  • Vice President John Biden

If used as a common noun, then the word vice president is lowercased such as in the following sentences:

  • The vice president will announce his candidacy this morning.
  • John Biden was the last vice president.

According to English capitalization rules, proper nouns are always capitalized. Therefore, when referring to a person with the title Vice President, always capitalize the word.

 

What about vice presidential? Should vice presidential be capitalized?

Vice Presidential is not a proper noun naturally, so it should be lowercased unless used in an official event title such as the “50th Vice Presidential Inauguration.”

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Everyone knows that the English language can be a bit of a minefield. And when you throw grammar and punctuation into the mix, it becomes even more complicated.

Are you writing an article about international leadership? Perhaps you are completing a college project on UK prime ministers.

If so, you might be wondering whether the phrase ‘prime minister’ is capitalized?”

Is Prime Minister Capitalized?

The short answer is yes. Well, at least sometimes.

You see, when used with names, instead of names or as an appositive, titles and political entities like ‘prime minister’ should be capitalized.

Here are a few examples:

  • UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson (with names)
  • Welcome, Prime Minister (instead of names)
  • Today, the President met with Boris Johnson, the current UK Prime Minister (as an appositive).

If ‘prime minister’ is not being used to replace a name, it should not be capitalized.

For example:

  • The prime minister is looking forward to meeting you.
  • The prime minister lives at No. 10 Downing Street.
  • Boris Johnson, prime minister.
  • Boris Johnson is the current prime minister for the UK.

The same applies to other professional titles such as professor, president, and king. For example:

  • Say hello to Professor Jeremy White (initial capital for professor – as it is being used with names)
  • Professor White is here to see you (initial capital for professor – as it is being used instead of names)
  • Barack Obama was the United States’ first black president (lower case for president as it is not being used to replace a name and it is not being used as an appositive)

As you can see, both words in ‘prime minister’ need to start with a capital letter or both need to start with a lower case letter, depending on the context. (Unless, of course, the word ‘prime’ is at the start of a sentence, when it will always need to have a capital letter).

As well as the above, you also need to comply with any style guides you are working with. For example, many workplaces and education establishments will have their own ‘rules’ in place to determine when and where you should use initial capitals. Consistency is key, so if you’re still not sure, always check with your boss or lecturer.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Whether to write “To Whom it may concern” or “To Whom it May Concern” is a common question from those who infrequently compose letters of complaint or inquiry. This is a common salutation and so, it is important to get the capitalization right. Indeed, the confusion is quite understandable.

There is a difference in opinion even with leading style guides. The Chicago Manual of Style claims that every word should be capitalized. However, there was no citation or even Q&A entry to back this up. The Gregg Reference Manual addresses this issue in full and led us to our conclusion.

“To Whom it may concern” or “To Whom it May Concern”?

The rule for capitalizations in salutations is that the first word, all nouns and all titles are capitalized. This means that “To whom it may concern” is the correct way to use this salutation. This is the point that is made on the Gregg Reference Manual.

The only words that are capitalized on their own in a salutation are the first word or any proper nouns and words that are standing in for a noun do not upgrade that word to a proper-noun. (This applies to the word “whom” in this case.) If this were the case then we would have to capitalize pronouns such as “he” or “she”. However this is usually only done when referring to a deity and so should not be done in a salutation such as this.

In Conclusion

In this way, salutations follow identical capitalization rules as sentences. Although there is some debate as to the right way in which to use the salutation, we conclude that following the guidelines that are set out by the Gregg Reference Manual, “To whom it may concern,” is the correct way in which to use this salutation. Having said this, it should be noted that this is simply an issue of style and so there may not actually be one “correct” way but there is still a standard in general usage.

The ideal width of a title that will appear in Google results is 600 pixels. This is because Google optimizes its search results to show website titles uniformly for standardized screen sizes. A 600-pixel width covers a wide range of devices, including older computers and mobile devices.

What is an SEO title?

The SEO title is the title that Google shows when you see search results. The title is one of three elements that Google shows for each result which include:

  • SEO title (in blue)
  • Page url (in green)
  • Meta description (in black)
seo width title result
Sample SEO title and elements in Google

The SEO title is also shown in the tab of browsers and provides an easy way for people to quickly know what each tab is. For example, you would quickly know that the tab below is our site:

title tag - capitalize my title

Why is SEO title width important?

Google aims to provide consistent user experience by giving all titles in its search results the same maximum width of 600 pixels. This allows for titles to render the same on multiple devices including mobile devices. See below for examples of how various  pages on our site render in Google.

seo title width
Our main page’s title is a little too wide for Google
seo width title mobile
It doesn’t get cut off on mobile, but only shows the basic information
seo width title - capitalization rules
Our capitalization rules page renders fully in Google search results.

How can you measure the width of your title?

Now that you know the importance of SEO title width, you can use our Headline Analyzer tool which will show you the width of your SEO title as well as score your title on various other factors.

In the modern age of Catholicism, where services, creeds and prayers periodically undergo regular revisions to capture the current papal ‘mood’, it can be difficult to keep track of which words should be capitalized. Historically, there was a trend to capitalize every noun related to God, including that of the pronoun “He”. Indeed, even the most devout Catholic writers still struggle to follow a consistent rule for capitalizing and non-capitalizing Catholic terms, which leads to more confusion. Is “Mass” capitalized when referring to the Catholic sacrament, or is “mass” equally valid in today’s world? Is there a difference between “catholic” and “Catholic”?

Is the word “mass” capitalized?

The word “Mass“, when referring to the Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, should always be capitalized. This is, in part, so it may be readily distinguished from the general, non-Catholic uses of the word “mass” – for example, when it refers to a large, non-specific number (e.g. a mass of people had gathered in the courtyard), or when referring to the physical unit of measurement mass that we measure in Newtons. Catholic Mass, as written with the upper-case initial, also functions to identify itself as a proper noun describing the specific liturgical ritual where the Eucharist is celebrated.

On occasions where “Mass” is preceded by a common adjective, the adjective is customarily written in lower-case, as seen in “evening Mass”, or “requiem Mass”.

(To answer the other question at the beginning of the article – yes, there is indeed a difference between Catholic and catholic! The former refers to being of the Roman Catholic faith, while the latter means universal, diverse, and all-embracing).

As you can see, there can be rather a large difference between a “Catholic Mass” and a “catholic mass”, and care should be taken so as not to confuse the two; the correct capitalization of “Mass” and “Catholic” has the remarkable ability to distinguish a Eucharistic liturgy from a non-specifically large, all-embracing quantity.

 

For more capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

In general, greetings are not capitalized in a sentence, but when used as salutations in email greetings they are capitalized.

You do have the option of only capitalizing the first word in the phrase of a salutation, but the choice is ultimately up to you.

For example, when used at the beginning of an email or as a greeting, the following phrases are capitalized:

  • All
  • Dear
  • Evening
  • Good Afternoon
  • Good Day
  • Good Evening
  • Good Morning
  • Good Night
  • Hello
  • Hey
  • Hi
  • Morning
  • To Whom It May Concern
  • Yo

For more capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Other Email Articles:

Telling someone “good night” is a nice way of wishing them a peaceful evening or sleep. But knowing whether and when the phrase is capitalized is challenging.

So, Is Good Night Capitalized?

Generally, the phrase “good night” is not capitalized when used in a sentence.

However, the phrase “good night” is capitalized when used in an email exchange, especially when it is used as a salutation at the beginning of an email. Email salutations (Dear, Hi, Hello, etc.) are capitalized anyways and “good night” is no exception. The same would apply for “good morning.”

Examples of Using Good Night

“Good Night, Mr. Kim!” said Jack as he was leaving work. It had been a great day at work and would be a good night. Before he went to sleep, he texted his wife, who was away on a business trip, and said “Good Night!” 

In the paragraph above, all three examples of the phrase “good night” were used. When Jack leaves the office he says goodbye to his boss so “good night” is capitalized. In the next sentence, the phrase is used generically in a sentence so it is not capitalized. Finally, in the text, Jack once again uses “good night” as a salutation so it is capitalized.

 

For more capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Greeting someone in the afternoon with a “Good Afternoon” is a great way to sound friendly and caring. But knowing whether and when the phrase is capitalized is challenging.

So, Is Good Afternoon Capitalized?

Generally, the phrase “good afternoon” is not capitalized when used in a sentence.

However, the phrase “good afternoon” is capitalized when used in an email exchange, especially when it is used as a salutation at the beginning of an email. Email salutations (Dear, Hi, Hello, etc.) are capitalized anyways and “good afternoon” is no exception. The same would apply for “good morning.”

Examples of Using Good Afternoon

“Good Afternoon, Mr. Kim!” said Jack when he got back from lunch. It was indeed a good afternoon and Jack got back to work right away by opening a new email and typing the following:

Good Afternoon,

Please find attached the report you were asking for.

-Jack

In the paragraph above, all three examples of the phrase “good afternoon” were used. When Jack first walks back into the office, he greets his boss with a salutation so “good afternoon” is capitalized. In the next sentence, the phrase is used generically in a sentence so it is not capitalized. Finally, in the email, Jack once again uses “good afternoon” as a salutation so it is capitalized.

 

For more capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Greeting someone in the morning with a “Good Morning” is a great way to sound friendly and caring. But knowing whether adn when the phrase is capitalized is challenging.

So, Is Good Morning Capitalized?

Generally, the phrase “good morning” is not capitalized when used in a sentence.

However, the phrase “good morning” is capitalized when used in an email exchange, especially when it is used as a salutation at the beginning of an email. Email salutations (Dear, Hi, Hello, etc.) are capitalized anyways and “good morning” is no exception. The same would apply for “good afternoon.”

Examples of Using Good Morning

“Good Morning, Mr. Kim!” said Jack when he arrived at work. It was indeed a good morning and Jack got to work right away by opening a new email and typing the following:

Good Morning,

Please find attached the report you were asking for.

-Jack

In the paragraph above, all three examples of the phrase “good morning” were used. When Jack first walks into the office, he greets his boss with a salutation so “good morning” is capitalized. In the next sentence, the phrase is used generically in a sentence so it is not capitalized. Finally, in the email, Jack once again uses “good” morning as a salutation so it is capitalized.

 

For more capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Lord is thought to be a proper noun because it refers to an individual person. If Lord is a proper noun that would mean it would always and should always be capitalized right? This is a very confusing topic and word capitalization at first because the word Lord is very predominate and strongly used in many religions.

Is the word lord capitalized?

When referring to Lord in religion people think of him or her as one. When speaking about a specific Lord in religion then the word should always be capitalized.

The confusion arises when a group of people is called lords and ladies. In this case, there is no single person specifically addressed so lord is spelled with a lowercase. If a person is referring to a title that is either positional or hereditary the word Lord would be capitalized.

When the word is used as a general honorific (I would be happy to fetch bread for you my lord) or used in a collective circumstance (good evening lords and ladies) it is not capitalized. The capitalization of the word is not that complicated when a person breaks it down.

The capitalization is the same as it would be used in many if not all other nouns. In the Christian religion, the word Lord should always be capitalized. There are many examples of words and sentences used by Christians that do not align with standard English grammar rules such as saying “I bless His holy name” or ” I bless His Holy Name” which are both incorrect. In the example, “his” should not be capitalized and neither should “holy” or “name” be. Religious phrases do not always correlate well with the English language which is understandable because there are certain phrases of respect that are only recognized in the specific religion. So should lord/Lord always be capitalized? No the capitalization of the word depends on the specific circumstance.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Determining whether the word “democrat” is capitalized or not is a question often asked in these trying political times. It can be a confusing question that depends on how the word is used.

When is “democrat” capitalized?

The word “democrat” is capitalized when used to refer to the political party, the Democratic Party. In this case, the word “party” is capitalized, too. This also is true when referring to someone as a Democrat.

Example: President Obama is a member of the Democratic Party.
Example: My parents are staunch Democrats.

The words “democrat” and “democratic” are not capitalized when referring to the political philosophy.

Example: My dad has a democratic ideologue.

The word “liberal” is generally lowercased as well when used in a sentence.

What about Democratic?

If you’re referring to a party such as the Democratic Party, you capitalize “democratic,” but not when it’s just referring to the political philosophy.

The rule is tricky when describing things other than a party as Democratic. For example, when Trump used “Democrat Lawmakers” in his letter to Nancy Pelosi about impeachment, he should have said “Democratic lawmakers” because lawmakers is a generic word. Unlike “party” in “Democratic Party,” “lawmakers” is not part of a proper noun.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Labor Day is a holiday that is celebrated in the United States of America on the first Monday in September and on May 1st in other countries. The holiday honors the labor movements in these countries and the contributions that workers have made to the national economy and the well-being of the countries.

Is Labor Day capitalized?

Yes, Labor Day is capitalized when used in a sentence because it is a proper noun referring to a holiday.

What is Labor Day?

In the US, Labor Day is an American national day to celebrate the American work ethic that has grown the country into a top-tier economy. It began in the late 19th century when trade unions and labor movements grew and asked for a national holiday. Labor Day officially became a national holiday in 1894 and is always celebrated on the first Monday of September.

Around the world, Labor Day (or Labour Day in the UK) also originated with the labor union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement, which advocated eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest. For most countries, Labour Day is the same as International Workers’ Day and both occur on May 1st.

Most people nowadays look at it as a recreational day when they get off from work or school (or the precursor to school for K-12 students), but it is important to remember the struggles workers around the world have put into labor reform.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Do you ever stop writing mid-sentence to ask yourself if you have correctly formatted your book title?

This is a fair question, and it demands a thoughtful answer. Since you want to deliver quality work, there are a few things you need to know about book title formatting. Wondering, “Are book titles underlined?” or “Are book titles italicized?” or further “Does it matter if my book title is italicized or underline?” only translates that as a reader or writer, you are paying attention to the nitty-gritty of your craft.

For some time now, or rather since the invention of computers and replacement of typewriters, there has been an ongoing debate if writers should use italics or underlines their book titles. And this begs the question;

Are book titles italicized?

The short answer to this is yes. There is a general rule (like a rule of thumb for writing book titles) that states that titles of more significant works should be italicized while those of smaller tasks should use quotation marks. Larger books have chapters, but also short works are subdivided into smaller parts. This, therefore, demands that the short texts are branded as more significant works and the titles should appear in italics.

The italics rule applies to both non-fictional and fictional works that have individual chapters.

Are book titles underlined?

For handwritten books, it is nearly impossible to correctly design your tiles in italics (compared to a computer). It is, therefore, an acceptable rule to underline such works for both small and large books.

While underlining a title is not advised, especially when doing a professional piece of work, a majority of readers take your book more seriously if you employ italics in your book title. The italics appearance is more futuristic while underlining only looks like an old-style of formatting book titles.

The style you are using should guide you on how to format your movie title. Formatting and capitalization in the different methods vary. These styles include the Chicago formatting style, American Psychological Association, and Modern Language Association techniques which all place titles of movies in italics. Other styles such as the Associated Press (AP) usually adopt quotations for movie titles.

About a movie title in the body of a given work or paper, all the listed styles above use title casing in that all the keywords within the work’s title are capitalized.

Do you underline movie titles?

In APA, MLA and Chicago styles, film or movie titles are formatted the same. In each of these styles, you should not underline movie titles – instead, they should be written in italics in the body of the text. An instance of this is as outlined below:

Avengers: Endgame
 has received heavy critic reviews for satisfying the past to deliver nothing short of a thrilling and emotional conclusion to superhero adventure.

The APA, MLA, and Chicago styles all use the case capitalization for the movie titles. All wordings, from nouns to pronouns, adjectives, verbs to adverbs are all capitalized. Nonetheless, minor wording such as conjunctions and prepositions use the lower case in the text unless they are the beginning words in the title.

It is a rule that under APA, all words that have more than four letters should be capitalized. For instance: Rick and Morty. In the reference lists, APA employs sentence case capitalization which translates that only the first words of the title, for example: For Whom the bell tolls and proper nouns such as place names and people names should be capitalized.

Under the AP style, the titles of movies are put in quotations. It is worth mentioning that standard rules for quotes within other quotes still apply. A good instance of this is:
The 2019 “Avengers: Endgame” broke the IMAX and Box office worldwide opening record to beat “Star Wars” which was the previous record holder.

English capitalization may appear simple at a glance but most people still make mistakes in capitalizing some words. For instance, some people do not know when and where to capitalize the word “birthday.” It can be confusing since we frequently see it in greetings and titles, but is the word “birthday” capitalized? Before we conclusively come to an answer, let’s evaluate it with standard English capitalization rules.

1. Capitalize the first word of a sentence. For example: Happy birthday John.

Following the conventional capitalization rules, birthday is not capitalized in this case.

2. Capitalize pronouns and other names of such special occasions. For example: Tomorrow will be Jane’s Birthday.

Birthday, in this case, falls under special occasions, so it is thus capitalized.

3. Capitalize months, days and holidays but not seasons. For example: His birthday will be on 23rd April which is next Monday.

However, there are exceptions to the above capitalization rules.

1. When using quotes in a sentence. In this case, capitalizing both “Happy” and “Birthday” is acceptable. For example: Andrew wished her “Happy Birthday”.

2. When using the phrase as a title case every word in the phrase is capitalized. For example: Helen’s Birthday Party.

So, is birthday capitalized? The answer depends on the sentence structure as seen in the examples above.

Want to learn more title capitalization rules? Try out our free title capitalization tool.

When is bible capitalized in a sentence? Sometimes it is capitalized and sometimes not so we explore the reasons for when the word “bible” is capitalized below.

When is the word “bible” capitalized?

When referring to the holy Christian book itself, the word Bible should always be capitalized. For example, “The story of Abraham is told in the Bible.” The word Bible is also capitalized when referring to the Jewish Bible, when used as the first word in a sentence, and when used in the main title of written works.

You always capitalize Bible when referring to a proper noun including the various versions of both the Christian and Jewish Bibles. For example “King James Bible”, “Gideon’s Bible” or “Hebrews Bible. “The Holy Bible” is a proper title of a book and the word bible in this case must always be capitalized.

You will find that at times, especially when you are likening other books to the Bible, you do not capitalize the word bible. For example, ” Gordon Ramsey’s cookbook is a chefs’ bible. Additionally, the adjective biblical is an exception of capitalization even though it refers to the proper noun of “Bible”.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Understanding the rules of capitalization can be challenging since the rules depend on the context of the sentence. The word “world” is no exception.

Is World Capitalized?

In general, the word “world” is lowercase except in three instances. The first instance of when “world” should be capitalized is when used as the first word in a sentence. For example, “World is a proper noun.”

The second instance when you should capitalize the word “world” is when the word is used as a part of a proper noun. For example, “World War II”. This is mainly because “world” in this scenario is a proper noun just like Jupiter, Pluto, or the Pacific Ocean.

The final instance when the word “world” is capitalized is when used in a title. Be it that of an article, a book, or any other written text. An example of such a case is a movie titled “Christopher Columbus Circumvents the World”.

We do not capitalize “world” when used as an abstract noun. A good example of a sentence where this applies is “Jane found herself in a world of trouble”. “You are stuck in a fantasy world” is also a good example of a sentence in which the word “World” is not capitalized.

Are Globe or Global Capitalized?

The same rules that apply to “world” also apply to “globe” and “global.” These are lowercase in most cases except when the word is first in a sentence, used in a title, or part of a proper noun. For example, in a regular sentence, you could say “The globe is spherical.” The same is true for phrases such as “global warming.”

However, if you’re writing a news headline, you would capitalize these words. For example, in the headline “This Is Now a Global Pandemic” you would capitalize the word “global.”

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Is the word mother capitalized? Is this question running through your head? If the answer is yes, then you have come to the right place. The word “mother” may or may not be capitalized depending on how it has been used in a sentence.

In general, the word “mother” is lowercased, but there are a few instances listed below when it is capitalized.

The word “mother” is capitalized:

1. When used as a proper noun or addressing one’s mother. An example is: Hello Mother, when are you going to visit me? However, you should not capitalize the word if you are referring to a relationship. “When I get back to the country, I will take my mother out.”
2. The word should also be capitalized when it’s used to refer to a holiday (Mother’s day).
3. When it’s used in a song or movie title.
4. Finally, the word mother should be capitalized when it’s the first word of a sentence.

Want to learn more title capitalization rules? Try out our free title capitalization tool.

Understanding the capitalization of religious terms can be confusing, especially when referring to the name of a person or figure. The word “god” is particularly confusing because it can be capitalized or not depending on how it’s used.

In religious texts, the word god is usually written with the first letter “G” capitalized. This is because when we use the word to refer to one supreme being, the word becomes a proper noun. As you know, we capitalize the first letter in a proper noun as a general grammar rule.

If the word god is used to refer to a pagan god, you do not capitalize the word. This is because there are several pagan gods and in such an instance, the word becomes a common noun. This also applies to any polytheistic religion, such as Hinduism, since there are multiple gods to which you could be referring.

When the word god appears at the beginning of a sentence, we usually capitalize the first letter of the word regardless of whether it is used to refer to a proper or a common noun.

Want to learn more title capitalization rules? Try out our free title capitalization tool.

 

Figuring out how whether or not the word church should be capitalized can sometimes be tricky. And in some circles, failing to follow the rules of capitalization is practically a sin. So how can you know when to capitalize church and when not to? It’s actually pretty easy if you follow these simple rules.

Church should be capitalized when it is the first word in the sentence as it is here. The word “church” should also be capitalized if you are mentioning the denomination of a specific church or using its proper name. For example, “Pope Francis is the current Pope of the Roman Catholic Church” or “He is a member of a Baptist Church.”

You don’t need to capitalize the word church if you are speaking about church in a general way. For example, “Sally goes to church every Sunday”. In this case, the word church is written in lowercase because it is not a proper noun.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Diwali, also called Deepavali or Dipavali, is the annual festival of lights celebrated by Hindus. Since it is a holiday, Diwali follows the standard rules of capitalization for proper nouns so it is capitalized.

What about “festival of lights?”

The phrase “festival of lights” is generally not capitalized unless used in a title.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “city” can be capitalized depending on when and how it is used. When used generically to describe a city which could be any city, then the word “city” is lowercase. This also includes when the word “city” is used before a named place.

However, when used as part of a proper noun, the word “city” is capitalized along with the rest of the proper name. 

You can find examples of when the word “city” is capitalized and not capitalized below.

Examples of When “City” Is Capitalized

  • New York City streets are mostly one-way.
  • Richmond City Hall
  • The City gave out several citizens’ awards.

Examples of When “City” Is Not Capitalized

  • You can’t fight city hall.
  • The city of Chicago is a great place to visit.
  • The city government is too bureaucratic.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

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The short answer is no, the word “summer” is a generic noun which does not require capitalization as per rules of capitalization for seasons. This rule applies to the names of all the seasons. You do not capitalize seasons when used in writing.

This rule has an exception when the word is used in a title, is used as a proper noun, or is the first word of a sentence. When you start a sentence with “summer” or are using it in a title, it should be capitalized. If you use summer as a proper noun, such as in “Summer Semester,” it must also be capitalized.

Another exception in which you should capitalize summer is when it is personified in poetry. Apart from these exceptions, there is no need to capitalize seasons, including summer, for any writing purposes.

So, the next time you are confused about capitalization rules for seasons, read these rules carefully to avoid capitalized the word “summer” in the wrong places.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Since Black Friday is not an official holiday, knowing whether it should be capitalized can be confusing.

Black Friday is a proper noun since it refers to the famous (infamous?) shopping that occurs annually right after Thanksgiving. Since all proper nouns are capitalized, Black Friday is also capitalized.

It may seem weird to think of a shopping day as a holiday, but since Black Friday has become so huge, it has become a named holiday and thus requires capitalization.

What other shopping days are capitalized?

There are a number of other major shopping days that should also be capitalized. These include:

  • Small Business Saturday (Saturday after Black Friday)
  • Cyber Monday (Monday after Black Friday)
  • Super Saturday (Saturday before Christmas)
  • Amazon Prime Day

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

To uppercase only the first letter in a cell in Excel, you can use the following formula:

=UPPER(LEFT(text_cell,1))&LOWER(RIGHT(text_cell,LEN(text_cell)-1))

For a sample string: “THIS is A SaMPLE StRIng.”

The result will be:

"This is a sample string."

A visual is below for your reference:

excel capitalize first letter

If you want to instead capitalize the first letter of each word in a cell, or uppercase/lowercase all characters in a cell, Excel already has some prebuilt formulas to do so.

For more questions about capitalization, use our free title capitalization tool.

Understanding the rules of capitalization for grade levels can be tricky since most people are inclined to think of grade levels as proper nouns. However, that is not usually the case with grade levels. Read on to understand the rules of capitalizing the word “senior.”

college guidesIn general, the word “senior” is lowercased when used in a sentence since it is a general noun. This is also true for other college and high school levels such as freshman, senior, and senior.

However, the word “senior” becomes a proper noun and thus capitalized when used in the name of an organized group or entity such as “Senior Class of 2020.”

For more questions about capitalizing grade levels, refer to our guide here or use our free title capitalization tool here to understand how to capitalize all sorts of words.

Understanding the rules of capitalization for grade levels can be tricky since most people are inclined to think of grade levels as proper nouns. However, that is not usually the case with grade levels. Read on to understand the rules of capitalizing the word “junior.”

college guidesIn general, the word “junior” is lowercased when used in a sentence since it is a general noun. This is also true for other college and high school levels such as freshman, junior, and junior.

However, the word “junior” becomes a proper noun and thus capitalized when used in the name of an organized group or entity such as “Junior Class of 2022.”

For more questions about capitalizing grade levels, refer to our guide here or use our free title capitalization tool here to understand how to capitalize all sorts of words.

Understanding the rules of capitalization for grade levels can be tricky since most people are inclined to think of grade levels as proper nouns. However, that is not usually the case with grade levels. Read on to understand the rules of capitalizing the word “sophomore.”

college guidesIn general, the word “sophomore” is lowercased when used in a sentence since it is a general noun. This is also true for other college and high school levels such as freshman, junior, and senior.

However, the word “sophomore” becomes a proper noun and thus capitalized when used in the name of an organized group or entity such as “Sophomore Class of 2022.”

For more questions about capitalizing grade levels, refer to our guide here or use our free title capitalization tool here to understand how to capitalize all sorts of words.

Understanding the rules of capitalization for grade levels can be tricky since most people are inclined to think of grade levels as proper nouns. However, that is not usually the case with grade levels. Read on to understand the rules of capitalizing the word “freshman.”

college guidesIn general, the word “freshman” is lowercased when used in a sentence since it is a general noun. This is also true for other college and high school levels such as sophomore, junior, and senior.

However, the word “freshman” becomes a proper noun and thus capitalized when used in the name of an organized group or entity such as “Freshman Class of 2023.”

For more questions about capitalizing grade levels, refer to our guide here or use our free title capitalization tool here to understand how to capitalize all sorts of words.

The capitalization rules for different grade levels and school types can be confusing. Sometimes they are capitalized depending on the situation so it is important to understand when to capitalize them or not.

Do you capitalize the grade levels in school?

Grade levels in school are generally capitalized if the word “grade” precedes the ordinal number of the grade such as in “Grade 8.” This is also the case when a grade level is used in a title or headline since most words are capitalized.

However, grade levels are lowercased when the word “grade” follows the ordinal number such as in “sixth grade.” This is also true when using compound adjectives such as “seventh-grade textbook.”

Examples of Correct Usage:

  • I’m in Grade 8.
  • My parents let me skip first grade.
  • I usually hang out with seventh-grade students.
  • I’m in the seventh grade.

What about freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior?

The grade levels in high school and college follow the same rules as the lower class levels. The words freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior should not be capitalized unless used in a title or referring to the names of organized entities, such as “Junior Class.”

 

Do you capitalize the levels of school?

Capitalization rules for the various levels of school can be confusing. In general, you only capitalize the words if they are part of a proper noun referring to a specific school or the words are in a title. Please refer to the specific examples below for various school levels.

Should elementary school be capitalized?

The phrase “elementary school” should not be capitalized when used in a sentence unless you are referring to a specific elementary school such as “Timberlane Elementary School.” You should also capitalize “elementary school” when used in a headline or title.

Examples of Correct Usage:

  • I attend elementary school.
  • He attends Thomas Jefferson Elementary School.

Should middle school be capitalized?

The phrase “middle school” should not be capitalized when used in a sentence unless you are referring to a specific middle school such as “Longfellow Middle School.” You should also capitalize “middle school” when used in a headline or title.

Examples of Correct Usage:

  • I attend middle school.
  • He attends James Madison Middle School.

Should high school be capitalized?

The phrase “high school” should not be capitalized when used in a sentence unless you are referring to a specific high school such as “Langley High School.” You should also capitalize “high school” when used in a headline or title.

Examples of Correct Usage:

  • I attend high school.
  • He attends McLean High School.

Should college be capitalized?

The phrase “college” should not be capitalized when used in a sentence unless you are referring to a specific college such as “Harvard College.” You should also capitalize “college” when used in a headline or title.

Examples of Correct Usage:

  • I attend college.
  • He attends Dartmouth College.

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

Determining whether the word “republican” is capitalized or not is a question often asked in these trying political times. It can be a confusing question that depends on how the word is used.

When is “republican” capitalized?

The word “republican” is capitalized when used to refer to the political party, the Republican Party. In this case, the word “party” is capitalized, too. This also is true when referring to someone as a Republican.

Example: President Trump is a member of the Republican Party.
Example: My parents are staunch Republicans.

The word “republican” is not capitalized when referring to the political philosophy.

Example: My dad is a republican ideologue.

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “uncle” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my uncle said to visit her,” then the word “uncle” is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: The other day I went shopping with my uncle.

However, when referring to an uncle by name such as “Uncle Jim,” then the word uncle is capitalized because it is a part of the name so it becomes a proper noun. This is also true when asking a question of your uncle.

Correct: My Uncle Jim is the best.
Correct: Can I go to the movies, Uncle?

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “father” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my father said to visit him,” then the word father is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: My father is the best.

However, if you are addressing your father directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word father.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Father?

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “dad” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my dad said to visit him,” then the word dad is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: My dad is the best.

However, if you are addressing your dad directly, such as when asking a question, then you should capitalize the word dad.

Correct: Can I go to the movies, Dad?

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word “aunt” can be capitalized depending on how it is used in a sentence or title. When used generically in a sentence such as: “my aunt said to visit her,” then the word “aunt” is lowercase because it is a generic noun.

Correct: The other day I went shopping with my aunt.

However, when referring to an aunt by name such as “Aunt Audrey,” then the word aunt is capitalized because it is a part of the name so it becomes a proper noun. This is also true when asking a question of your aunt.

Correct: My Aunt Audrey is the best.
Correct: Can I go to the movies, Aunt?

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word governor often confuses people when it comes to capitalization. Is it governor or Governor? When do you capitalize it?

The word governor can be a proper noun or a common noun depending on the context in which it is used.

If Governor is used to refer to a specific person with a title, then it is capitalized such as:

  • Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
  • Governor Charlie Baker

If used as a common noun, then the word governor is lowercased such as in the following sentences:

  • The governor will announce his candidacy this morning.
  • Dan Malloy was not a great governor.

According to English capitalization rules, proper nouns are always capitalized. Therefore, when referring to a person with the title Governor, always capitalize the word.

 

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

The word mayor often confuses people when it comes to capitalization. Is it mayor or Mayor? When do you capitalize it?

The work mayor can be a proper noun or a common noun depending on the context in which it is used.

If Mayor is used to refer to a specific person with a title, then it is capitalized such as:

  • Mayor Michael Bloomberg
  • Mayor Jenny Durkan

If used as a common noun, then the word mayor is lowercased such as in the following sentences:

  • The mayor will announce his candidacy this morning.
  • Michael Bloomberg was a great mayor.

According to English capitalization rules, proper nouns are always capitalized. Therefore, when referring to a person with the title Mayor, always capitalize the word.

What about mayoral? Should mayoral be capitalized?

Mayorial is not a proper noun naturally, so it should be lowercased unless used in an official event title such as the “50th Mayoral Inauguration.” However, if you are referring to an even that takes a while, such as the election cycle, then you would lowercase mayoral such as in “2017 Seattle mayoral election.”

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

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Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States of America to celebrate the remembrance for those men and women in the military who passed away for the victory of the nation.

Is Memorial Day capitalized?

Yes, Memorial Day is capitalized when used in a sentence because it is a proper noun referring to a holiday.  Wearing symbols like red poppy also signifies the day. The word day is capitalized because it is part of the holiday as it’s observed in other holidays.

What is Memorial Day?

Memorial Day is a national day for respected heroes who died in the country. The holiday always falls on the last Monday in the month of May. Besides, It’s celebrated every year. Memorial Day is celebrated by raising the US flag and lowered to half staff and then brought to a full-height in the afternoon. It was first proclaimed on 5th May 1868 by General John A. Logan after the Civil War when it was first known as Decoration Day.

Most people nowadays look at it as a recreational day when they get off from work or school, but it is important to reflect on the suffering and loss by those who served to protect America’s interest.

For more title capitalization questions, use our free title capitalization tool here.

It depends. If you are referring to a specific job title such as “Head of Digital Marketing” then you should capitalize the job title with regular title capitalization rules since it is a proper noun.

However, if you are referring to a general job title in a sentence such as “program chair” in the following Objective Statement: “I am seeking a position as a program chair,” then you should lowercase the job title.

These rules even apply to executive titles at a company.

For more help with capitalizing job titles and other resume sections, refer to our guide on resume capitalization.

Yes, Good Friday is capitalized because it is a proper noun and a named holiday. Even though Friday is always capitalized since it is a day of the week, Good is capitalized in this case as well since the two words together refer to the religious holiday that comes two days prior to Easter.

Good Friday is a Christian holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus three days before he rose again.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Yes, Ash Wednesday is capitalized because it is a proper noun and a named holiday. Even though Wednesday is always capitalized since it is a day of the week, Ash is capitalized in this case as well since the two words together refer to the religious holiday marking the beginning of Lent which precedes the Easter celebration.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Yes, Lent, when it refers to the season leading up to the Easter holiday, is capitalized because it is a proper noun and a named holiday. When the word refers to giving money to someone, then it is lowercase unless used in a title.

Easter is a religious holiday of the Christian faith celebrating the rebirth of Jesus Christ after he died on the cross. Lent marks the 40-day period prior to Easter which begins with Ash Wednesday.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Yes, Easter (and Easter Day) is capitalized because it is a proper noun and a named holiday. The word “day” is capitalized when used right after “Easter'” since it is part of the holiday name.

Easter is a religious holiday of the Christian faith celebrating the rebirth of Jesus Christ after he died on the cross. Other holidays associated with Easter include Lent, Ash Wednesday, and Good Friday.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Generally, yes. If you are referring to the Catholic Church, then “Catholic” and “Church” should be capitalized since they refer to a proper noun. If you are referring to someone who practices Catholicism, then you should capitalize Catholic as well.

When would you lowercase Catholic?

When it first entered the English language in the 16th century, catholic meant “common” or “general” so the religion was naturally the “common” religion. When the Western Church split from the rest of the church after the Reformation, it began referring to itself as the Catholic Church, but the word catholic still meant “general” or “common” when used by itself.

What about Catholicism?

Since Catholicism is a noun referring to the Catholic religion, it is capitalized as well.

 

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

While most people have no problem with the basic capitalization rules, when it comes to more difficult capitalization questions people start getting confused. When it comes to the government, when and where should you capitalize? Is the word constitution capitalized?

Is Constitution Capitalized?

When it comes to the word constitution, it all depends on if it is being used as an adjective or to refer to the legally binding document.
Even though the constitution is not a proper noun, when it comes to the legally binding document in the US, it should be capitalized. For example, “America’s original Constitution has been stored in the national archives.”
When using the constitution as an adjective, you’re supposed to write it in lowercase. If you are also using it in a descriptive manner, it should be in lowercase. For example, “our singing group needs a better constitution.”

Capitalization and Government

What are the capitalization rules in regards to the government? For starters, you’re supposed to capitalize the word government only if you are referring to any sovereign nation e.g. it is the Government’s duty to provide medical services to its citizens.
All government departments are supposed to be capitalized e.g. Federal Bureau of Investigation except when they are used as an adjective. The capitalization rules also apply to some government terms like the cabinet, administration, federal, etc.
When it comes to the government, capitalization rules may not really apply. While normally the word constitution would be in lowercase, when referring to the government’s document, it is capitalized. In such a scenario, it is treated as a proper noun and thus capitalization has to apply.
Knowing the correct rules for capitalization can be challenging, especially for words such as federal and state. As a result of this, the question of whether “federal” is capitalized often arises in different conversations both at schools and other places.

Should you capitalize “federal?”

When used as a proper noun or a title, the word can be uppercase. This means that in cases where it is used to refer to a government entity or institution its first letter should be capitalized. For instance, you can write “Federal Bureau of Investigation” or “Federal Trade Commission.”
However, you cannot write “Federal Courts.” When the word is used as a generic adjective you use lowercase letters. For example, you can write “federal laws” or “federal assistance.”
In some cases, the general rule above may not always be followed. For instance, when the word is used as part of a title of any published document, it has to be capitalized. This also applies in cases where one is using a quote from another published piece. Direct in-text citations require capitalization if the first letter is capitalized in the original text regardless of whether it is used as an adjective or noun.

Should you capitalize “Federal Government?”

Sometimes. When used as a proper noun and referring directly to the “Federal Government” in its official capacity, then you should capitalize it. In most cases, however, you should use lowercase “federal government” according to the Chicago Manual of Style and AP Stylebook since the government is composed of multiple branches and is not a singular entity.

Conclusion

The fact that most professional editors like to use the word in lowercase letters can add to the confusion about its correct capitalization. However, government guidelines and other writing styles can provide the best guidance.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Yes, Presidents’ Day is capitalized because it is a proper noun and a named holiday. The word “day” is capitalized when used right after the “Presidents'” since it is part of the holiday name.

Presidents’ Day was originally created in 1885 as a holiday to celebrate George Washington’s birthday on February 22nd since he was the first President of the United States. It was moved in 1971 to be the third Monday of February to allow for a three-day weekend for workers. These days, Presidents’ Day is meant to celebrate all Presidents of the United States, past and present.

What about the apostrophe in Presidents’ Day? Does it come before or after the “s”?

The apostrophe is after the “s” because the day refers to a collection of famous presidents whose birthdays were all around the middle of February (Washington, Lincoln, and a few others) so the day belongs to several presidents.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Is university capitalized? It’s not a simple yes or no, unfortunately. There are instances when one is required to capitalize the word “university” while in others, a lowercase is required. Without further ado, let’s get to the distinctions.

When is university capitalized?

When it is a proper noun since proper nouns are always capitalized

Proper nouns differ from other types of nouns in that, they offer specificity to a person, a place or a thing. If we, for instance, say, “The boy is coming,” it could just be any boy, However, if we state that “Peter is coming,” then we have specified which boy is coming hence the name Peter is capitalized. The same applies to the term “university.”

When used as a proper noun such as “University of Virginia” or “Oxford University,” then the university is capitalized. It has a physical presence and can be seen, visited and addressed. As such, it is a proper noun, which requires capitalization according to the conventions of grammar.

Even when used alone, the term “University should still be capitalized if it still sustains specificity. For example: “I wish to attend the University of Arizona. The University offers specialized programmes whose standards are universally accepted.”

Note that the term ‘University’ has been used twice in the sentence above. In the first instance, it appears within a proper noun. However, in the second, it is used alone. Since we already are aware which university is being talked about, then the word is still capitalized as It pertains to a specific institution.

Another example would be: “UCLA was closed down. Wildfire was the cause of the University’s closure.”

When is University not capitalized?

When it is a common noun

If you are talking about a university in general, then it becomes a common noun and is hence not subject to capitalization. Common nouns are generic names that offer no specificity. If we. say: “Going to university is an ideal dream to many people.” Then “University” becomes generic. Nobody knows which exact university we are talking about. Grammatically, any common noun should be written in a lower-case-format.

Conclusion

When it comes to the term “University,” the key aspects to consider are proper or common. If it appears as a common noun, then do not capitalize. However, if it demonstrates the properties of a proper noun such as identity and specificity, then, by all means, do capitalize.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

France is one of the most beautiful countries in the world and the French tend to hold themselves to very high standards. As such, it is expected that any terminology relating to the nation itself, its people or speech should adhere to strict grammatical rules.

So, is French Capitalized?

The simplest answer is yes since French, even when used as an adjective, is referencing a proper noun. However, before any explanation is provided, it is wise to explore which parts of speech the term pertains to as it will facilitate understanding.

1. It is a proper noun

Nouns are names of places, people and things, we all know that. The term “French” can be used as a noun and a proper noun for that matter. For example, if we say: “The French has just arrived,’ The word ‘French’ represents nationality. Rules of grammar place nationality under proper nouns. The term can just as well be replaced with a real name such as Donald, James or Sarah. This, therefore, forms one of the bases to why the word “French” should be capitalized.

2. It can also function as a proper adjective

Any word that modifies a noun is known as an adjective. They come before a noun and are used to give more information about the noun. The term “French” not only plays the role of a noun but can also be an adjective. For instance: “The French Economy is quite stable.” The noun, in this case, is the word “Economy.” However, once we add French to the sentence, then the Economy is awarded an identity, a French one to be precise. Thus, the word French modifies the currency as a proper adjective. As per the rules of capitalization, proper adjectives should also be capitalized.

Conclusion

Generally, no matter what part of speech the term “French” represents, it should always be capitalized. I will leave you with the following two examples of how the word can be used as both a proper noun and proper adjective.
Examples:
  • Noun: The French make great food.
  • Adj: Paris is a French city.
America is among the prominent English-speaking nations whose rich linguistic heritage is widely documented. As such, it is expected that any terminology relating to the nation itself, its people or speech should adhere to strict grammatical rules.

So, is American Capitalized?

The simplest answer is yes since American, even when used as an adjective, is referencing a proper noun. However, before any explanation is provided, it is wise to explore which parts of speech the term pertains to as it will facilitate understanding.

1. It is a proper noun

Nouns are names of places, people and things, we all know that. The term “American” can be used as a noun and a proper noun for that matter. For example, if we say: “The American has just arrived,’ The word ‘American’ represents nationality. Rules of grammar place nationality under proper nouns. The term can just as well be replaced with a real name such as Donald, James or Sarah. This, therefore, forms one of the bases to why the word “American” should be capitalized.

2. It can also function as a proper adjective

Any word that modifies a noun is known as an adjective. They come before a noun and are used to give more information about the noun. The term “American” not only plays the role of a noun but can also be an adjective. For instance: “The American Currency is quite stable.” The noun, in this case, is the word Currency. However, once we add American to the sentence, then the currency is awarded an identity, an American one to be precise. Thus, the word American modifies the currency as a proper adjective. As per the rules of capitalization, proper adjectives should also be capitalized.
Examples:
  • Noun: Every eligible American should register as a voter.
  • Adjective: JFK is an American Airport.

Conclusion

Generally, no matter what part of speech the term “American” represents, it should always be capitalized. I will leave you with the following two examples of how the word can be used as both a proper noun and proper adjective.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Yes, state names should always be capitalized since they are proper nouns. Since they are specific locations, they need to follow capitalization rules for proper nouns.

Examples:

  • Michigan, United States
  • Virginia, United States
  • Occitanie, France
  • Bavaria, Germany

You should also always capitalize the word “state” if it follows the specific name of a state such as “California State.”

It’s not easy to know when to capitalize the word “state.” It can actually can be quite confusing. So, should you capitalize the word state?

Situations Where the Word State Should Be Capitalized

The word state should be capitalized when it comes after the name of a state. For example, “Michigan State.” It seems pretty easy to understand but for residents of Washington State and New York State, it can get confusing. These citizens of these states need to differentiate themselves from other geographical entities namely Washington D.C and New York City.

For all other state citizens, there’s no need for one to use the word “State” when describing where they are from. For example, it is enough for one to say, “I am from Colorado.” They don’t have to say, “I am from Colorado State”. However, it is not enough for a Washington State resident to simply say, “I am from Washington”. Such a person will have to specify and say, “I am from Washington State.”

The word State must be capitalized when talking about the United States as a country. For example, “Kenya’s first direct flight to the United States was commissioned late last year.” You can also say, “My cousin relocated to the States last month.”

You must also capitalize the word state when it forms the full name of a specific body. For example, “The State Finance Department.” The word should only be capitalized if it forms part of the name of the specific body. For example, you cannot say, “ the State’s Finance Department.” It will have to be as follows, “the state’s Finance department.”

Situations Where the Word State Shouldn’t Be Capitalized

The word state shouldn’t be capitalized if it comes before the name of the state. For example, it should be “the state of Colorado” and not “the State of Colorado”.

The word state shouldn’t be capitalized if it is used in place of a state’s name. For example, you should say, “She is a state employee.”

In addition, you shouldn’t capitalize the word state is used in a general sense. For example, “The state of affairs in Colorado State is quite okay.”

Conclusion

The English language is quite divided when it comes to when the word “state” should be capitalized. Scholars and language guides often contradict each other. For example, the “Chicago Manual of Style” and the “Associated Press Playbook” contradict each other on whether the word “state” should be capitalized if it comes after the state’s name.

It is easier to follow the guide provided above to avoid confusion. It will definitely help your state of mind.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

It depends. When referring to a specific region, you should capitalize the words West Coast such as “I’m traveling to the West Coast” since “West Coast” is a proper noun in this case.

However, if you are referring to a general region, such as “the west coast of the United States” then you should keep the words lowercase.

Confusing, we know, but the capitalization rules for west coast are related to why directions are also sometimes capitalized and sometimes not. You can read more about the rules for directions here.

It depends. When referring to a specific region, you should capitalize the words East Coast such as “I’m traveling to the East Coast” since “East Coast” is a proper noun in this case.

However, if you are referring to a general region, such as “the east coast of the United States” then you should keep the words lowercase.

Confusing, we know, but the capitalization rules for east coast are related to why directions are also sometimes capitalized and sometimes not. You can read more about the rules for directions here.

Understanding proper capitalization rules is crucial if you are updating your resume and want to make an impression on your future employer. You want to make sure that all of your job titles and job titles are properly capitalized since recruiters often spend less than 30 seconds scanning through a resume.

So, is associate’s degree capitalized? If you were writing an article, would you quote it as ‘associates degree’ or ‘Associate’s degree?’ I bet most people won’t get this right.

Is associate’s degree capitalized?

The simple answer is no, you do not capitalize either of these two words if you are using them generically in a sentence, unless, of course, they are used at the beginning of a sentence when basic capitalization rules apply.

However, if you are referring to the specific degree that you earned or are earning, then you should capitalize it. Title capitalization rules require that you capitalize each word when quoting the specific name of the associate’s degree such as Associate of Science.

These rules can be summarized as follows:

Correct: I enrolled in an associate’s degree in arts and science.
Correct: I’m studying for an Associate of Science.

Incorrect: I enrolled in an Associate’s Degree program in arts and science.
Incorrect: I’m studying for an associate of arts and science.

The same rules also apply for a bachelor’s degree, a master’s program, and doctorate degree programs.

Why don’t we generally capitalize ‘associate’s degree?’

Remember the basic rules of capitalization that you learned in middle school? Well, they will apply here. The rules of grammar require that we do not capitalize common nouns such as school, house, hospital etc. as they are general names. The term associate’s degree is also a common noun. There is no particular degree by the name of ‘associate’s degree.’ It is simply a generalization. However, when giving the degree a name, then it earns an identity. These are referred to as proper nouns and should, thus, be capitalized.

Conclusion

The rules of capitalization cannot be summarized in a single article. Deeper research is therefore recommended to fully grasp the guidelines pertaining to proper capitalization. For example, although we now know that ‘associate’s degree’ is not capitalized and that the degree name is, did you know that the major specialty in the degree program is not capitalized? I leave you to ponder upon this. In the meantime, give our free tool a try.

 

Understanding proper capitalization rules is crucial if you are updating your resume and want to make an impression on your future employer. You want to make sure that all of your job titles and job titles are properly capitalized since recruiters often spend less than 30 seconds scanning through a resume.

So, is master’s degree capitalized? If you were writing an article, would you quote it as ‘masters degree’ or ‘Master’s degree?’ I bet most people won’t get this right.

Is master’s degree capitalized?

The simple answer is no, you do not capitalize either of these two words if you are using them generically in a sentence, unless, of course, they are used at the beginning of a sentence when basic capitalization rules apply.

However, if you are referring to the specific degree that you earned or are earning, then you should capitalize it. Title capitalization rules require that you capitalize each word when quoting the specific name of the master’s degree such as Master of Science.

These rules can be summarized as follows:

Correct: I enrolled in a master’s degree in arts and science.
Correct: I’m studying for a Master of Science.

Incorrect: I enrolled in a Master’s Degree program in arts and science.
Incorrect: I’m studying for a master of arts and science.

The same rules also apply for an associate’s degreebachelor’s program and doctorate degree programs.

Why don’t we generally capitalize ‘master’s degree?’

Remember the basic rules of capitalization that you learned in middle school? Well, they will apply here. The rules of grammar require that we do not capitalize common nouns such as school, house, hospital etc. as they are general names. The term master’s degree is also a common noun. There is no particular degree by the name of ‘master’s degree.’ It is simply a generalization. However, when giving the degree a name, then it earns an identity. These are referred to as proper nouns and should, thus, be capitalized.

Conclusion

The rules of capitalization cannot be summarized in a single article. Deeper research is therefore recommended to fully grasp the guidelines pertaining to proper capitalization. For example, although we now know that ‘master’s degree’ is not capitalized and that the degree name is, did you know that the major specialty in the degree program is not capitalized? I leave you to ponder upon this. In the meantime, give our free tool a try.

 

Understanding proper capitalization rules is crucial if you are updating your resume and want to make an impression on your future employer. You want to make sure that all of your job titles and job titles are properly capitalized since recruiters often spend less than 30 seconds scanning through a resume.

So, is bachelor’s degree capitalized? If you were writing an article, would you quote it as ‘bachelors degree’ or ‘Bachelor’s degree?’ I bet most people won’t get this right.

Is bachelor’s degree capitalized?

The simple answer is no, you do not capitalize either of these two words if you are using them generically in a sentence, unless, of course, they are used at the beginning of a sentence when basic capitalization rules apply.

However, if you are referring to the specific degree that you earned or are earning, then you should capitalize it. Title capitalization rules require that you capitalize each word when quoting the specific name of the bachelor’s degree such as Bachelor of Science.

These rules can be summarized as follows:

Correct: I enrolled in a bachelor’s degree in arts and science.
Correct: I’m studying for a Bachelor of Science.

Incorrect: I enrolled in a Bachelor’s Degree program in arts and science.
Incorrect: I’m studying for a bachelor of arts and science.

The same rules also apply for a master’s program and doctorate degree programs.

Why don’t we generally capitalize ‘bachelor’s degree?’

Remember the basic rules of capitalization that you learned in middle school? Well, they will apply here. The rules of grammar require that we do not capitalize common nouns such as school, house, hospital etc. as they are general names. The term bachelor’s degree is also a common noun. There is no particular degree by the name of ‘bachelor’s degree.’ It is simply a generalization. However, when giving the degree a name, then it earns an identity. These are referred to as proper nouns and should, thus, be capitalized.

Conclusion

The rules of capitalization cannot be summarized in a single article. Deeper research is therefore recommended to fully grasp the guidelines pertaining to proper capitalization. For example, although we now know that ‘bachelor’s degree’ is not capitalized and that the degree name is, did you know that the major specialty in the degree program is not capitalized? I leave you to ponder upon this. In the meantime, give our free tool a try.

 

You might be skeptical, but the answer is yes! Days of the week are capitalized. It does not matter where the day of the week falls in a sentence, it should be capitalized whether it is in the middle or end of a sentence. The question is why?

So, Why Are Days of the Week Capitalized?

Why should we capitalize days of the week? Simple, all days of the week are proper nouns and any proper noun like your name, name of a place, or event must start with a capital letter.
For instance, Monday is a noun and not just a common noun like girl or dog, but a proper noun naming a specific thing and in this case a specific day which is Monday. So, when writing, you use the day of the week as a proper noun to emphasize the day.
Example: “Tom is coming on Monday.”
In this sentence we see that Tom is a proper noun because Tom is a name of a person and Tom is Tom nobody can replace Tom with anything so the same goes with Monday. Monday or any day of the week is a name of a specific thing. Monday is Monday and cannot be changed. Nouns especially proper nouns like Tom or Monday are names of things that are unchangeable. A proper noun cannot change.

What About Capitalizing the Word “Day”?

This sentence can change when we write it this way. “The boy will arrive any day.” As you can see, boy and day are nouns but in this case, they are common nouns. They are not capitalized “day” can refer to any day, not just a specific day like Monday. The boy could also arrive on Tuesday or Wednesday. Also, boy is lowercase because a boy is not specific person like Tom. A boy can be any boy and a day can be any day and not a Monday!
The secret is that proper nouns like Dubai (which is a name of a place), Monday (day of the week) or Tom (name of a person) are things that cannot be changed. So, when they are used in a sentence, the user wants to specify and emphasize on the instructions of the sentence. Proper nouns are easy to identify in a sentence because every sentence with a proper noun has some authority of a certain magnitude.
So, in our sentence, “Tom is coming on Monday,” the writer wants us to know that it is Tom who is coming and not any boy and he is coming on Monday and not any day. The writer is being specific.
With this explanation, we believe you are now able to differentiate between proper nouns and common nouns and you are now able to confidently write days of the week in capital letters wherever they appear on a sentence.
In conclusion, days of the week should be written in capital letters when they are named.
To check the capitalization of more words, check out our free title capitalization tool.

The short answer is yes, Valentine’s Day is capitalized because it is a special date referring to a holiday. It also always has an apostrophe since it refers to the holiday celebrating St. Valentine.

You should capitalize all proper nouns in the English language. This includes all holidays and special events.

When can you lowercase Valentine’s Day?

Whenever you refer to the day itself, you must capitalize it, but if you use the word as an adjective to describe gifts, a greeting, or a person, you don’t need to capitalize it. Examples include:

  • I bought her a valentine present; I hope she’ll like it.
  • I got a valentine card from him today.
  • Be my valentine.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

 

Sometimes. You only need to capitalize school subjects if you are referring to a specific title of a class such as “Algebra 2.” In this case, you are referring to a proper noun as the class name. However, if you are referring to the general subject of algebra, then it does not need to be capitalized.

The same is true for college majors. You only capitalize them if they are part of the degree that you are being awarded, such as a “Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.”

The following examples of classes would need to be capitalized:

  • AP Physics
  • Physical Education 2
  • Algebra 2
  • Drafting 101
  • English Literature
  • Computer Science 101

The following subjects would not need to be capitalized since they refer to the generic topic:

  • physics
  • math
  • physical education/gym
  • computer science
  • art

If you want to know what other words should be capitalized, try our free title capitalization tool.

The short answer is yes, you capitalize the word English regardless of whether you’re referring to the nationality, the school subject, or the language because all of these are proper nouns.

Normally English is a proper noun and all proper nouns in the English language are capitalized. Even when used as an adjective, such as in the “English language” or the “English curriculum,” English is capitalized because according to this Wikipedia article adjectives derived from proper nouns retain their capitalization:

In English, adjectives derived from proper nouns (except the names of characters in fictional works) usually retain their capitalization
– e.g. a Christian church, Canadian whisky, a Shakespearean sonnet, but not a quixotic mission, malapropism, holmesian nor pecksniffian.

Where the original capital is no longer at the beginning of the word, usage varies: anti-Christian, but Presocratic or Pre-Socratic or presocratic (not preSocratic).

If you want to know what other words should be capitalized, try our free title capitalization tool.

You should only capitalize directions, such as north, south, east, and west, when you are referring to the direction as a proper noun, such as “in the South” or “up North.” If you are merely referring to a direction, such as “go south on I-90,” then you should keep the direction lowercase.

Some common examples of when you should capitalize the direction include:

  • down South
  • the Deep South
  • out West

and when you should lowercase the direction:

  • in the south of France
  • go north on I-90 and then east

What about capitalizing northern, southern, eastern, western?

The same rules apply to capitalizing southern as capitalizing directions with a -ern at the end. If you are referring to a group of proper nouns such as “the Southern States.” However, if you’re referring to a general location, such as “the southern winds” then southern should be lowercase.

What about capitalizing Northerner, Southerner, Easterner, Westerner?

You should always capitalize these words since it refers to a region (a proper noun) where a group of people are from.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

You should only capitalize directions, such as west, when you are referring to it as the proper noun, such as “in the West.” If you are merely referring to a direction, such as “go west on I-90,” then you should keep west lowercase.

Some common examples of when you should capitalize west include:

  • down West
  • the Deep West

and when you should lowercase it:

  • in the west of France
  • go west on I-90 and then south

What about capitalizing western or Westerner?

The same rules apply to capitalizing western as capitalizing west. If you are referring to a group of proper nouns such as “the Western States.” However, if you’re referring to a general location, such as “the western winds” then western should be lowercase.

You should always capitalize Westerner since it refers to a group of people who are proper nouns.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

You should only capitalize directions, such as east, when you are referring to it as the proper noun, such as “in the East.” If you are merely referring to a direction, such as “go east on I-90,” then you should keep east lowercase.

Some common examples of when you should capitalize east include:

  • down East
  • the Deep East

and when you should lowercase it:

  • in the east of France
  • go east on I-90 and then south

What about capitalizing eastern or Easterner?

The same rules apply to capitalizing eastern as capitalizing east. If you are referring to a group of proper nouns such as “the Eastern States.” However, if you’re referring to a general location, such as “the eastern winds” then eastern should be lowercase.

You should always capitalize Easterner since it refers to a group of people who are proper nouns.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

You should only capitalize directions, such as north, when you are referring to it as the proper noun, such as “in the North.” If you are merely referring to a direction, such as “go north on I-90,” then you should keep north lowercase.

Some common examples of when you should capitalize north include:

  • down North
  • the Deep North

and when you should lowercase it:

  • in the north of the United States
  • go north on I-90 and then south

What about capitalizing northern or Northerner?

The same rules apply to capitalizing northern as capitalizing north. If you are referring to a group of proper nouns such as “the Northern States.” However, if you’re referring to a general location, such as “the northern winds” then northern should be lowercase.

You should always capitalize Northerner since it refers to a group of people who are proper nouns.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

You should only capitalize directions, such as south, when you are referring to it as the proper noun, such as “in the South.” If you are merely referring to a direction, such as “go south on I-90,” then you should keep south lowercase.

Some common examples of when you should capitalize south include:

  • down South
  • the Deep South

and when you should lowercase it:

  • in the south of France
  • go south on I-90 and then north

What about capitalizing southern or Southerner?

The same rules apply to capitalizing southern as capitalizing south. If you are referring to a group of proper nouns such as “the Southern States.” However, if you’re referring to a general location, such as “the southern winds” then southern should be lowercase.

You should always capitalize Southerner since it refers to a group of people who are proper nouns.

To know what other words you should capitalize, try our free title capitalization tool.

Yes, Columbus Day is capitalized when referring to the holiday.

It is grammatical and customary to capitalize federal, secular, and religious holidays. Columbus Day is a federal holiday in the United States that celebrates Columbus’ discovery of North America. It occurs on the first Monday of October to celebrate Columbus’ landing in North America on October 12, 1492.

For more answers to capitalization questions, see our FAQs or try out our free capitalization tool.

Generally, no. Unlike president which is capitalized when referring to a specific president, such as President Obama, first lady shouldn’t be capitalized. According to the White House Museum website, it is acceptable to honorifically capitalize first lady such as “First Lady  Michelle Obama.” However, since the first lady is never officially elected or sworn in, “first lady” is not a title and shouldn’t be capitalized.

We guess that FLOTUS should instead be flOTUS. 🤷‍♂️

For more answers to capitalization questions, see our FAQs or try out our free capitalization tool.

Yes. The Supreme Court is capitalized because it is a proper noun referring to a governmental judicial body that oversees the law of the land. This includes the highest court in each state, such as the California Supreme Court. However, when referring to generic supreme courts, such as in this sentence, you do not need to capitalize it.

What about capitalizing the word court?

According to lawprose.org, the word “court” should not be capitalized unless included in the title of a specific court, such as the “Supreme Court.”

For more answers to capitalization questions, see our FAQs or try out our free capitalization tool.

Yes, the word “Congress” is capitalized because it is a proper noun referring to a governmental legislative body. The House of Representatives and the Senate are also capitalized.

Examples of capitalizing the word include the U.S. Congress, Congress, etc.

What about congressional?

Congressional is not a proper noun naturally, so it should be lowercased unless used in an official event title such as the “Congressional Baseball Game.”

For more answers to capitalization questions, see our FAQs or try out our free capitalization tool.

Knowing the correct capitalization rules for government bodies and their officials can be difficult so here we are to help.

Is Senate Capitalized?

Yes. The word Senate is capitalized because it is a proper noun referring to a governmental legislative body.

Examples of capitalizing the word include the U.S. Senate, the Senate, the state Senate, etc.

What About the Word “Senator?”

While the word Senate is capitalized, the role itself is lowercase when referring to a general senator or senators. However, if you refer to a specific senator by name, then you need to capitalize it. For example:

Not capitalized: The senators will vote on an important healthcare bill today.
Capitalized: The bill was opposed by Senator Bernie Sanders.

 

For more answers to capitalization questions, see our FAQs or try out our free capitalization tool.

The word President often confuses people when it comes to capitalization. Is it president or President? When do you capitalize it?

The word “president” is a proper noun or a common noun depending on the context in which it is used, so the capitalization rules vary.

If President is used to refer to a specific person with a title, then it is capitalized such as:

  • President Donald Trump
  • President Barack Obama

If used as a common noun, then the word president is lowercased such as in the following sentences:

  • The president will announce his candidacy this morning.
  • George Washington was the first president.

According to English capitalization rules, proper nouns are always capitalized. Therefore, when referring to a person with the title President, always capitalize the word.

 

What about presidential? Should presidential be capitalized?

Presidential is not a proper noun naturally, so it should be lowercased unless used in an official event title such as the “50th Presidential Inauguration.”

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

No, the word fall is not capitalized and neither is the word autumn.

We capitalize days of the week and months of the year, but when it comes to capitalizing seasons, the rule is, we don’t capitalize them. If we did, we would have to capitalize every particular time period, even those occurring throughout the day, like morning and afternoon. This would look absurd and get quite confusing.

Fall, being a season, is a general noun. Therefore, the capitalization that applies to proper nouns doesn’t apply to fall so the season fall is not generally capitalized.

fall leaves

There are situations, however, where fall is capitalized. For example, at the beginning of a sentence where the rule of the capitalizing the first letter applies. Other examples of when you can capitalize fall are when the season forms part of a proper noun, or when it’s a part of a title. For example in ‘Fall Games’ or ‘Fall Semester.’

Another example is when its personified in a piece of creative writing, like in poems. But this only applies when fall is given life in such writing.

Overall, the general rule is that we don’t capitalize seasons, fall included.

December is that unique month where people do celebrate a wide range of holidays. One of the obvious tasks that most people will be engaged in will be to send their loved ones greetings and best wishes. It has become a common norm for many to use the phrase “Happy Holidays” when sending greeting cards or wishing someone well during the holiday season. Why? The obvious reason for this case is because people want to wish their loved ones the best in the many holidays that they will be celebrating in one go.

 

So, do you capitalize “Happy Holidays?”

Yes, because even though the word “Holidays” isn’t a proper noun, it’s used in this phrase to replace the many of the holidays people might be
celebrating
such as Christmas, New Years, and Hanukah. It is therefore common practice to capitalize the phrase since people have come to accept it.

Even though the word “Holidays” isn’t a proper noun, it’s used in this phrase to replace the many of the holidays people could be celebrating such as Christmas, New Years, and Hanukah. It is therefore a common practice to use the phrase as it is since people have come to accept it.

It’s also acceptable to use Happy Holidays in a sentence like, “I’m wishing you Happy Holidays together with your family.”

Secular and religious holidays are usually capitalized. This includes the words such as eve and day if they form part of the holiday name.

This is because these nouns are proper nouns that refer to the holiday specifically. The rule of capitalization, therefore, is that their first letter is capitalized.

These holidays, usually correspond to celebrations of specific important events such as the commemoration of Father’s Day, Mother’s Day or Valentine’s Day, national holidays that commemorate national events such as Independence Day and Martin Luther King Jr. Day in the United States. This rule is also observed for religious occasions such as Lent, Advent and Christmas day for Christians, Ramadhan for Muslims, and Hanukkah for Jews.

Holiday names are special nouns that are unique and thus they are not common nouns. In grammar, it is therefore prudent to capitalize them to emphasize their importance and uniqueness.

You have already written holiday cards and are now ready for dispatch, but you decide to, first, double-check your use of capitalization. So, do you capitalize Merry Christmas? Well, yes!

The reason is, unlike the word holiday, which does not refer to any officially elected day but rather the entire season, Christmas Mass is the official name of a characterized religious holiday. So, provided you are writing it as a proper noun, and as such refers to a specific day, Merry Christmas capitalized, should appear on all your cards.

 

Shortening Holiday Terms

When you combine the words such as day and eve with the holiday name, make sure you capitalize Christmas and the accompanying words. Note that shortening the holiday name does except it from capitalization because they still refer to specific events in the region’s history. In the same way, always capitalize proper holiday nouns such as New Years’ Eve, Thanksgiving (celebrated in The United States), Halloween and Boxing Day (observed in the United Kingdom) and other similar terms.

 

When Not to Capitalize the Accompanying Words

When, for instance, you are referring to an individual being merry on that particular day you don’t capitalize the complimentary word. So, telling someone to have a happy Christmas (without caps in the adjective) is grammatically correct. Your use of the adjective joyous is not unique since you could as well have chosen any other words with the same meaning such as happy, merry, festive, sober and so forth. However, Christmas has to be in caps because even in the sentence it refers to a designated occasion.

 

Conclusion

Merry Christmas is always capitalized because Christmas points to a particular day and hence is a proper noun. The accompanying adjective is also a part of the command. So, make sure you get it right any time you use it.

The short answer is yes, the Fourth of July is capitalized because it is a special date, a holiday. You should capitalize the “Fourth” and “July,” but lowercase the “of” because “of” is a short word.

If you are referring to the Fourth as “Independence Day” then it should also be capitalized since again it is a special date.

The other thing to keep in mind when spelling out “Fourth of July” is that you should not shorten “Fourth” to “4th.” It turns out various style guides have rules that apply for times when numbers are spelled out. Let’s take a look:

1. When talking about age (for people and animals), numerals are used.

E.g. Jason is 17 years old.

2. Single digit numbers (less than 10) should be spelled out.

E.g. The American Flag has 50 stars, but only three colors. On average, Americans have four beers during Independence Day celebrations.

3. Ordinal numbers below 10th need to be spelled out. Any number over that is written down in numerals

E.g The Fourth of July Celebrations just began.

 

The third rule is especially important. We can always say Fourth of July, July Fourth or July 4. It is however grammatically incorrect to say 4th of July.

 

 

 

Yes, Father’s Day is capitalized when referring to the holiday.

Reason #1: While Father’s Day is not an official federal holiday, it is considered to be one of the most common celebrations, like Groundhog Day and April Fools’ Day. That’s why it is always capitalized.

Alternatively, the following words like father, mother, and dad are broadly termed as ‘family names.’ They are generally used as a common noun. However, whenever you are using these family names in the form of proper nouns, they need to be capitalized. For your reference, the examples are given below:

I) My father is not well. – Here the word ‘father’ has been used as a common noun and it isn’t capitalized.

II) I have planned to celebrate Father’s Day on 18th June. – Here the word ‘father’ has been used as a proper noun. Thus, it is capitalized.

 

Reason #2: Father’s Day is widely celebrated to honor fathers as individuals. This is the day when the children portray their sincere respect and gratitude towards their fathers. This day is special and unique to every father. Considering its significance and importance, the term Father’s Day is capitalized.

 

For more Father’s Day grammar, try the Grammarly Father’s Day quiz:

 

You should not capitalize the word winter since it is a common noun and not a proper noun. But there are obviously a few exceptions where one has to capitalize the word winter.

When winter is used as a title or when it is used at the beginning of a sentence (such as “Winter is Coming”) are two examples of when winter should be capitalized. Also when winter is used as a proper noun it should be capitalized. Winter can also be capitalized it when it is personified such as in a poem.

photo winter

 

The word winter does not necessarily need to be capitalized considering it is a generic noun. People normally confuse this word for a proper noun and capitalize it based on it being a proper noun. Generally, the word winter should not be capitalized.

For example,

The temperatures are usually low during the winter season.

 

The Word Winter as a Title

When the word winter is used like a title one will have to capitalize it since it is a rule to capitalize titles.

For example,

The Winter Holiday Was Very Chilly

“Winter” was included in a title and we must follow title capitalization rules and capitalize it.

 

The Words Winter as a Proper Noun

It is a rule in the English language that proper nouns have to be capitalized, so when using the word winter as a proper noun you have to capitalize it.

For example,

The Winter Gala is an event held every year in December.

In this case “Winter Gala” is the name of an event so “winter” is part of a proper noun. Therefore it should be capitalized.

The word “in” is always lowercase unless it is the first or last word in a sentence.

Generally, you should capitalize the word “is” when using title case (Chicago, APA, AP). However, if you are using sentence case in APA, you should only capitalize “is” if it is the first word in the sentence.

Generally, you should capitalize the word “world” when using title case (Chicago, APA, AP).

However, if you are using sentence case in APA, you should only capitalize “world” if it is the first word in the sentence or is part of name (such as “World Wide Web” or “World Wildlife Federation”).

Generally, you should capitalize the word “it” when using title case (Chicago, APA, AP). However, if you are using sentence case in APA, you should only capitalize “it” if it is the first word in the sentence.

When the word is referred to generically, “university” is not capitalized. When used as a proper noun, such as “Florida State University,” the word is capitalized.

The Florida State University offense could use some work this year.

The board of the university elected the new president.

– More examples

No. The word “the” is always lowercased in all title capitalization styles unless it is the first or last word in a sentence.

Yes, according to all English title capitalization rules, you must capitalize the holiday title. This includes both holidays where businesses are closed as well as church holidays.

If the holiday contains multiple words, all words should be capitalized in the title. For example: New Year’s Day. 

Even if the holiday is shortened, such as in “New Year’s,” both words should still be capitalized.

A list of the most common holidays capitalized is below:

Advent

All Saints’ Day

Australia Day

Bastille Day

Boxing Day

Canada Day

Christmas (also Christmas Day and Christmas Eve)

Coming of Age Day (Japan)

Easter

Epiphany

Father’s Day

Good Friday

Halloween

Hanukkah

Holocaust Remembrance Day

Holy Thursday, Holy Saturday, Holy Week

Independence Day (US) also the Fourth of July and July Fourth

Kwanzaa

Labor Day (US)

Labour Day (Canada and other nations)

Lent

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (US)

Maundy Thursday

May Day

Memorial Day

Michaelmas (the feast of Saint Michael the Archangel)

Mother’s Day

New Year’s (also New Year’s Day and New Year’s Eve)

Passover

Presidents’ Day

Purim

Ramadan

Remembrance Day

Rosh Hashanah

St George’s Day (no period or full stop with St in BrE)

St. Patrick’s Day (also Saint or St Patrick’s Day)

Thanksgiving (also Thanksgiving Day)

the High Holy Days

Twelfth Night

Valentine’s Day

Veterans Day (no apostrophe)

Victoria Day (Canada)

Victory Day (Russia)

Yom Kippur

 

The short answer is yes. You should capitalize all days of the week (Monday, Tuesday, etc), months (August, September, etc.), and holidays (Christmas, Halloween, etc.).

Thanksgiving in November, Christmas in December, and New Years in January: North America has a lot of winter holidays.

Your birthday is in March, right?

– More examples

Generally, you should capitalize all nouns in a sentence if you are using title case (Chicago, APA, AP). However, if you are using sentence case in APA, you should only capitalize the first word in a sentence and only proper nouns ¹.

Hyphenated words are complicated and depend on which style you are using. You can find the rules for hyphenated words for CMOS and APA below or you can use our free capitalization tool.

Using The Chicago Manual of Style:

  1. Always capitalize the first element.
  2. Capitalize any subsequent elements unless they are articles, prepositions, coordinating conjunctions
  3. If the first element is merely a prefix or combining form that could not stand by itself as a word (anti, pre, etc.), do not capitalize the second element unless it is a proper noun or proper adjective.
  4. Capitalize the second element in a hyphenated spelled-out number (twenty-one or twenty-first, etc.) or hyphenated simple fraction (two-thirds in two-thirds majority).

Using APA:

  1. Capitalize the first and second element of a hyphenated phrase.

To automatically capitalize your titles with the correct rules for hyphens, try our free capitalization tool.

Yes, Internet should be capitalized whenever it is used.

When referring to the Internet as a proper noun (ie you are referring to the World Wide Web), then Internet should be capitalized. If you are referring to a general network of computers, then you can use the lowercase internet. Most of the time, Internet will be capitalized. Learn more about this on-going debate here.

However, you should always follow the standard title capitalization rules for capitalizing titles.

Short Answer: Yes

Long Answer: Halloween is a holiday and proper noun, so it should be capitalized according to title capitalization rules.

 

What about capitalizing the word “night” after Halloween?

While Halloween is a holiday and proper noun, the word “night” right afterward is not capitalized in a sentence, but will be capitalized in a title if you are using any of the styles in title case such as when referring to the movie “Halloween Night.”

You can read more about how to capitalize Halloween in this article.

[fusion_builder_container admin_label=”” hundred_percent=”no” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=”” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”left top” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”0px” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”20″ padding_left=””][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=”” min_height=””][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=”” min_height=””][fusion_title size=”3″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]Chicago Manual of Style[/fusion_title][fusion_text]

  • Capitalize the first and the last word.
  • Capitalize nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, and subordinate conjunctions.
  • Lowercase articles (a, an, the), coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions.
  • Lowercase the ‘to’ in an infinitive (I want to play guitar).

[/fusion_text][fusion_button link=”http://amzn.to/1RYaFHy” title=”” target=”_self” alignment=”center” modal=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” color=”custom” button_gradient_top_color=”#e80707″ button_gradient_bottom_color=”#e80707″ button_gradient_top_color_hover=”” button_gradient_bottom_color_hover=”#d60707″ accent_color=”#ffffff” accent_hover_color=”#ffffff” type=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” size=”” stretch=”default” shape=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]See Style Guide[/fusion_button][fusion_separator style_type=”none” top_margin=”20px” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=”” /][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=”” min_height=””][fusion_title size=”3″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]APA/MLA[/fusion_title][fusion_text]

  1. Capitalize the first word of the title/heading and of any subtitle/subheading
  2. Capitalize all major words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns) in the title/heading, including the second part of hyphenated major words (e.g., Self-Report not Self-report)
  3. Capitalize all words of four letters or more.

[/fusion_text][fusion_button link=”http://amzn.to/1RYaL1Z” title=”” target=”_self” alignment=”center” modal=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” color=”custom” button_gradient_top_color=”” button_gradient_bottom_color=”#e80707″ button_gradient_top_color_hover=”” button_gradient_bottom_color_hover=”#d60707″ accent_color=”#ffffff” accent_hover_color=”#ffffff” type=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” size=”” stretch=”default” shape=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]See Style Guide[/fusion_button][fusion_separator style_type=”none” top_margin=”20px” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=”” /][/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=”” min_height=””][fusion_title size=”3″ content_align=”left” style_type=”single solid” sep_color=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””]AP[/fusion_title][fusion_text]

  1. Capitalize words with 4 or more letters.
  2. Capitalize the first and the last word.
  3. Capitalize nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, and subordinate conjunctions.
  4. Lowercase articles (a, an, the), coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions.
  5. Lowercase the ‘to’ in an infinitive (I want to play guitar).
  6. [/fusion_text][fusion_button link=”http://amzn.to/1oyvX2M” title=”” target=”_self” alignment=”center” modal=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” color=”custom” button_gradient_top_color=”” button_gradient_bottom_color=”#e80707″ button_gradient_top_color_hover=”” button_gradient_bottom_color_hover=”#d60707″ accent_color=”#ffffff” accent_hover_color=”#ffffff” type=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” size=”” stretch=”default” shape=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]See Style Guide[/fusion_button][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Hanukkah is a popular Jewish holiday and since it is a proper name for a holiday, the word is capitalized when used in writing as per the rules of capitalization.

The word Hanukkah is capitalized but the word “holiday” is not capitalized as in “Hanukkah holiday” since it is not a proper name. You should capitalize Hanukkah in holiday cards or wishes and all proper holiday names as well. It is very common to make this capitalization mistake but the right expression makes your wishes and cards seem professional and correct. Hanukkah is also spelled as Chanukah in some parts of the world but both the words are names for the same holiday. So the next time you start writing your holiday cards or wish someone in writing, make sure it has the word “Hanukkah” capitalized.

Hanukkah is also spelled as Chanukah in some parts of the world, but both the words are names for the same holiday and thus both should be capitalized. So the next time you start writing your holiday cards or wish someone “Happy Hanukkah” in writing, make sure the word “Hanukkah” is capitalized.

Tools

Did you know that you can post bold text on Facebook that will make your status updates stand out? It’s really easy to do with our bold text generator. Just follow the steps below for bolding in Facebook posts or messages.

1. Bolding Text in Facebook Posts

  1. Go to our bold text generator.
  2. Enter your text in the “Input” field above:
    step 1 - enter bold text for Facebook
  3. Click “Copy” at the top right of the Output box or copy the text manually by right clicking or pressing “CTRL + C” to copy the text to your clipboard.
  4. Go to Facebook.com and enter what ever text you want to have that’s not bold.
  5. Paste the bold text where you want it.
    step 2 - post bold text to Facebook
  6. Post!

The best part about bold text is that you can easily copy and paste them to social media such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

2. Bolding Text in Facebook Groups

Some Facebook groups and communities give you a rich text editor where you can bold the text right in the input field. You can also add bullets, create header text, and more.

  1. Go to a supporting Facebook group or community and begin creating a post.
  2. Select the text you want to bold and you should see a popup come up that allows you to bold text.
    Facebook Bold Text In Groups
  3. Click “B” for bold.
  4. Post!

3. Bolding Text in Facebook Messenger and Chat

There is another option for bolding text in Facebook Messenger and chat. Facebook has some existing markdown that you can use.

1. Go to Facebook Messenger and type out the message you want to send.
2. Before and after the message, put an asterik (*) before and after it. See below.

Facebook Bold And Italic Text
Markdown surrounding text
Facebook Bold And Italic Text 2
Once the message is sent it has bold and italics

3. Send your message in bold text!

You can also underline text by putting an underscore (_) before and after the text or strikethrough with a tilde (~). For more, see Facebook’s help content.

No, but you can still get a Grammarly discount on us. There is no Grammarly student discount through Grammarly’s website, but by clicking our banner below, you can get a Grammarly discount all the same. It’s like having a Grammarly student discount after all!

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Grammarly does have a program for educators though called [email protected] which works with educational institutions to provide Grammar tools for teachers and students. If you are interested in getting a [email protected] account, check it out here.

How do you get the discount?

  1. Click this link or the banner below:
    grammarly discount banner - grammarly review
  2. Look for this banner at the top:
  3. Click “Go Premium” and register for Grammarly Premium.

Should you get Grammarly Premium?

Grammarly Premium does offer a lot of great features that extend the functionality of the basic Grammarly and Grammarly Chrome plugin. We offer a great guide that walks you through the pros and cons of Grammarly Premium here.

Other Useful Articles:

  1. [2020 Update] Does Grammarly Offer a Free Trial?
  2. Grammarly Review 2020: A Writer’s Best Friend
  3. Grammarly vs. Ginger vs. Whitesmoke Review 2020

Grammarly used to offer a money-back guarantee for one week after you signed up for Grammarly Premium so you could cancel your subscription after using it for one week, but unfortunately, they have since done away with the free trial due to rampant abuse.

That said, there are still ways to get a trial of Grammarly Premium or receive a discounted price:

1. Sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program

If you sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program, you can request a one-month free trial of Grammarly Premium in order to test out the advanced features. If you then write an article about Grammarly and email the affiliate team, you can receive a $25 bonus!

grammarly trial - affiliates
Ask Grammarly for a free one-month trial of Grammarly Premium when you sign up for the affiliate program

2. Receive a 10% discount on Grammarly Premium

Capitalize My Title users get a 10% discount when they sign up for Grammarly Premium through our link or the banner below.

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How do you get a refund for Grammarly Premium?

Unfortunately, these days it is difficult to get a refund from Grammarly for your current payment period. Their policy, as of 30-August 2019, states that “If you cancel after your subscription renewal date, you will not receive a refund for any amounts that have been charged.” You can still try contacting their customer service, but don’t get your hopes up.

grammarly refund - terms and conditions
Grammarly’s Terms and Conditions as of 30-August 2019

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo that involves a series of work sprints where you work for a set period of time (15-30 minutes) and then taking a break short break (5-10 minutes).

The name Pomodoro Technique comes from the word pomodoro, from the Italian word for ‘tomato‘, which is what the original kitchen timers Cirillo used resembled when he first created the technique.

What are the benefits of the Pomodoro Technique?

The intent is that you focus intently on a task for the working period and don’t get distracted because you know that a break is coming up shortly. Normally, it’s easy to stop working when you feel stuck or need to go to the bathroom.

The Pomodoro Technique lets you avoid these distractions since you know that you’ll get a break within a few minutes. It can also help you break through challenges because you are forced to continue working until the time expires.

Do you have any recommended tools to leverage the Pomodoro Technique?

We love the Tomato Timer because it’s a dead-simple online tool and has preset “short” and “long” break timers. It has a set 25-minute working block that can’t be adjusted, but this time works for us. There are plenty of other phone apps and online tools to use the technique or you can just use a simple kitchen timer.

Read More:

Grammarly has made installing their free Grammarly chrome plugin extremely simple. All you need to do to install the Grammarly Chrome plugin is follow the steps below. If you want to learn more about why we recommend Grammarly, read our Grammarly review.

 

How to Install the Grammarly Chrome Plugin

1. Go to Grammarly.com

Go to Grammarly’s website to get access to the Grammarly Chrome plugin.

 

2. Click on the “Add to Chrome – It’s Free” button

 

3. Authorize the Grammarly Chrome extension

When the popup opens that asks whether you want to “Add ‘Grammarly for Chrome,'” click “Add Extension.

Click “Add extension” to install the Grammarly Chrome plugin

 

4. Confirm installation of the Grammarly Chrome plugin

Make sure that the Grammarly logo appears in the top-right corner of your Chrome browser.

chrome grammarly

5. Upgrade to Grammarly Premium for over 400+ checks for common Grammar issues

Click on the banner below to get a Grammarly Premium discount of 10%:

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Grammarly is our favorite free grammar checker tool. We love the free version of Grammarly, but if you want to upgrade to Grammarly Premium, we have negotiated a special Grammarly discount for you. With our special link below you can get access to 10% percent off Grammarly Premium. If you want to learn more about Grammarly before you buy, read our Grammarly review.

Grammarly DiscountClick the banner above to get your Grammarly discount

Writing

Freelance editing is a great way to earn extra income and can even become a full-time gig if you develop the right skills and clients.

Freelance Editing Rates

The amount you charge for editing generally depends on your skill level. Beginner or junior editors will charge a lower rate than more experienced editors. As you build up your reputation and take on larger clients, you can begin to gradually increase your rates.

The amount you charge will also depend on where you live. US clients will typically expect that a foreign editor, for example, one based in the Philippines, will charge less than a US-based editor of similar skill because the cost of living in the Philippines is lower.

Below are some common freelance editing rates for various skill levels for US-based editors:

LevelFee Per WordEst. Per Hour (500 Words)
Entry level.005-.01$2.5-$5
Intermediate.01-.02$5-$10
Experienced.02-.05$10-$25

Freelance writing is a great way to earn extra income and can even become a full-time gig if you develop the right skills and clients.

Freelance Writing Rates

The amount you charge for writing generally depends on your skill level. Beginners or junior writers will charge a lower rate than more experienced writers. As you build up your reputation and take on larger clients, you can begin to gradually increase your rates.

The amount you charge will also depend on where you live. US clients will typically expect that a foreign writer, for example, one based in the Philippines, will charge less than a US-based writer of similar skill because the cost of living in the Philippines is lower.

Below are some common freelance writing rates for various skill levels for US-based writers:

LevelFee Per WordEst. Per Hour (500 Words)
Entry level.03-.06$15-$30
Intermediate.07-.12$35-$60
Experienced.13-.20$65-$100
Expert.21-.30$105-$150

Grammarly used to offer a money-back guarantee for one week after you signed up for Grammarly Premium so you could cancel your subscription after using it for one week, but unfortunately, they have since done away with the free trial due to rampant abuse.

That said, there are still ways to get a trial of Grammarly Premium or receive a discounted price:

1. Sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program

If you sign up for the Grammarly Affiliate Program, you can request a one-month free trial of Grammarly Premium in order to test out the advanced features. If you then write an article about Grammarly and email the affiliate team, you can receive a $25 bonus!

grammarly trial - affiliates
Ask Grammarly for a free one-month trial of Grammarly Premium when you sign up for the affiliate program

2. Receive a 10% discount on Grammarly Premium

Capitalize My Title users get a 10% discount when they sign up for Grammarly Premium through our link or the banner below.

grammarly discount banner - grammarly review

How do you get a refund for Grammarly Premium?

Unfortunately, these days it is difficult to get a refund from Grammarly for your current payment period. Their policy, as of 30-August 2019, states that “If you cancel after your subscription renewal date, you will not receive a refund for any amounts that have been charged.” You can still try contacting their customer service, but don’t get your hopes up.

grammarly refund - terms and conditions
Grammarly’s Terms and Conditions as of 30-August 2019

Press releases are often a big deal, and their importance might have you asking “Is press release capitalized?”

The short answer is no, but when it comes to capitalization, there are always a few exceptions to the rule. Taking a look at a few example sentences will help you fix your sentence before you send that important email or letter.

Capitalizing “Press Release” In a Sentence

When talking casually about a press release or mentioning it in a sentence, the words “press release” are not capitalized. For example,

There is a press release scheduled for noon.

The restaurant held a press release on Thursday.

Our year-end press release is on New Year’s Eve.

In all of these examples, “press release” is not capitalized. It is not a proper noun, such as a name or a place, so like all nouns, it is left uncapitalized.

Exceptions to the Rule

Of course, there are a few exceptions to the rule. The first one, of course, is to always capitalize the words “press release” in a title. While capitalization in titles is different depending on MLA, APA, or other styles, the general rule of thumb is to capitalize all important words and words five letters or longer. Press release fits both of those categories, so it is capitalized in a title. For example,

The Thrive Solutions Press Release

2019 Old Town Book Store Press Release

However, if you were to mention a specific press release in passing, it would not be capitalized. For example,

Are you going to the Thrive Solutions press release?

What day is the Old Town book store press release?

In general, you shouldn’t worry about capitalizing “press release” unless you are writing a title or a formal email, discussing a specific event. While English may seem like a tangled web of rules, it’s best to remember to use lowercase when discussing press releases.

To learn more about proper title capitalization rules, give our free title capitalization tool a try.

Email addresses are composed of two parts: the username and the domain. The username is to the left of the @ symbol and the domain name (which the username is created on) is to the right side. For example:

username@dom.ain

Both domains and usernames can include letters, numbers, and symbols, but what about capital and lowercase letters?

Are email addresses case sensitive?

Domain names are case insensitive so GMAIL.com, gMAIL.com, and gmail.com all go to the same place. Therefore, the domain side of the email address is case insensitive. 

However, the username side of email addresses can contain uppercase and lowercase letters. The difference with usernames is that most email clients interpret uppercase and lowercase letters differently so most of the time [email protected] is different than [email protected]

This does depend on the email client and how they process email address usernames. For example, Gmail processes email addresses with periods and mixed in the middle the same way. Therefore [email protected] is the same as [email protected] Both are the same as [email protected]

Examples:

Other Email Articles:

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